VEGETARIAN JOURNAL'S FOODSERVICE UPDATE

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Vegetarian Journal's Foodservice Update
Healthy Tips and Recipes for Institutions

Volume VII, Number 3 Summer 1999  

VEGAN PRODUCTS

Excerpts from Vegan Products:


THINK POTATOES WHEN ADDING VEGETARIAN ITEMS TO YOUR MENU

Here are some ideas. Fresh potatoes are always available; if purchasing dried potato products from your purveyor, be sure to check the label, as milk or dairy solids are sometimes added to potato mixes.

· ROSTI POTATOES : peel and grate russet potatoes. Toss potatoes with chopped onions, minced garlic, and chopped fresh thyme and chives. Melt margarine in a sauté pan, add potatoes, and press to form discs (kind of like bumpy, 3-D potato pancakes). Cook until golden brown on the outside, warm in the center.

· QUICK POTATO PANCAKES : mash potatoes (use margarine and soymilk or vegetable broth for the liquid). Form into patties and fry or bake. Or you can coat patties with seasoned breadcrumbs and chopped herbs and then fry or bake. Serve with hot applesauce, mushroom gravy, or tomato sauce.

· STUFFED BAKED POTATOES: bake potatoes and carefully scoop out pulp; set the shells aside. Mash the pulp with margarine, fresh herbs, or chopped veggies and refill shells with mixture. Bake to heat (or brown under broiler).

· POTATO SHELLS: same process as stuffed baked potatoes, but use the pulp as a side dish and stuff reserved shells with veggie chili, sautéed vegetables, or rice pilaf.

· HASH BROWNS: shred leftover cooked potatoes (use some from the potato shells) and sauté on the grill with salt and pepper, or add chopped veggies, such as onions, peppers, and garlic.

· MASHED POTATOES: at the upscale Brownstone Restaurant in Houston, you can order truffle-mashed potatoes en croute (mashed potatoes laced with truffles, enrobed in pastry and baked).


QUICK SPUD BUYING GUIDE

Russets cook up dry and flaky, and while they can be used for salads, are best for baking and mashing (they absorb fluid well and fall apart easily, which is what you want for a topped baked potato or fluffy mashed).

Red rose (also called white rose, new, and boiling potatoes) are good for salads and casseroles, as they retain their shape and don’t mush easily.

Yukon golds are a variety of new potatoes and are good for both mashing and salad making (and their slightly gold color gives a creamy appearance to menu items).

Peruvian Purples are slightly lavender in appearance, but can turn an unsightly gray if held for too long, so slice them and fry or bake them as chips for garnishes.

Fingerling potatoes are getting to be more available at reasonable prices. They are soft, sweet, and delicate and can be steamed, tossed with herbs and served as an accompaniment.


Excerpts from the Summer 1999 Issue:


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Converted to HTML by Stephanie Schueler.



VRG Home | About VRG | Vegetarian Journal | Books | Vegetarian Nutrition
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June 14, 1999

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