VRG-NEWS: The Vegetarian Resource Group Newsletter
Volume 14, Issue 6
October 2010

CONTENTS

  1. GLUCONO DELTA LACTONE IS AN ALL-VEGETABLE INGREDIENT
  2. BREAKFAST TOFU LINKS
  3. FAQS ABOUT VITAMIN D
  4. VANCE'S "VEGAN FRIENDLY" DARIFREE MILK CONTAINS VITAMIN D FROM LANOLIN
  5. VEGAN WITH BRACES
  6. VRG'S VEGAN DINNER IN BOSTON 11/7/10
  7. QUESTIONS ABOUT THE UNITED NATIONS' LIVESTOCK'S LONG SHADOW
  8. LESSON PLAN: WATER CONSERVATION AND DIETARY CONNECTIONS (GRADES 5-8)
  9. 3RD EDITION OF DIETITIAN'S GUIDE TO VEGETARIAN DIETS
  10. HOW DO I GAIN WEIGHT AS A VEGETARIAN ATHLETE?
  11. VRG ORGANIZATION TIMELINE
  12. DONATING STOCK TO THE VRG
  13. VRG AT HAMPDENFEST, IN BALTIMORE
  14. LESSON PLAN: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SURFACE WATER QUALITY WITH DIETARY CONNECTIONS (GRADES 9-12)
  15. SHOP AT THEVEGETARIANSITE AND SUPPORT THE VRG!
  16. PRE-THANKSGIVING VEGETARIAN POTLUCK
  17. PART-TIME JOB AVAILABLE
  18. About The Vegetarian Resource Group
  19. About VRG-NEWS

1) GLUCONO DELTA LACTONE IS AN ALL-VEGETABLE INGREDIENT

By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS VRG Research Director

The VRG recently received an email from someone who asked us if glucono delta lactone (GDL) was derived from lactose in cow's milk. (The "lactone" part of this ingredient's name made him suspicious.) Glucono delta lactone is an ingredient in many foods, functioning as a substitute for enzymes in cheese processing or tofu manufacturing; or as a leavening acid in bakery products.

We asked the quality control or research and development departments of several companies that manufacture glucono delta lactone about their starting materials as well as about the production process. We spoke with Archer Daniels Midland, Purac America, PMP Fermentation Products, Inc., and Wintersun Chemical. All four companies reported that their glucono delta lactone is (or, was, in the case of ADM and Purac which no longer produce it), entirely plant-based. It is prepared by microbial (bacteria or yeast) fermentation of a carbohydrate source. Additional processing or chemical reactions are not involved in manufacturing glucono delta lactone.

Corn is (and always has been) the major commercial source. Rice may be used as well. Ener-G Foods uses rice by a method involving bacterial fermentation in order to produce leavened breads that are yeast-free.

Interested readers may subscribe to our free email newsletter [ http://www.vrg.org/vrgnews ] for updates on glucono delta lactone and many other common food ingredients. You can purchase our Guide to Food Ingredients to learn about the commercial sources of over two hundred food ingredients at [ http://www.vrg.org/ingredients/index.php ].


2) BREAKFAST TOFU LINKS

Julia Driggers, RD, shares a recipe for Breakfast Tofu Links.

Servings: 4

Ingredients

14 oz Extra Firm Tofu
1/4 Cup Canola Oil
1/4 Cup Apple Cider Vinegar
2 TBSP Maple Syrup
1 TBSP Agave Nectar
1 1/2 TBSP Soy Sauce
1/3 cup Cold Water

Directions

Cut Tofu into thin, 2 inch strips. Set aside. In shallow Tupperware or 9 X 9 baking pan add Canola oil, apple cider vinegar, maple syrup, agave nectar, soy sauce, and cold water. Mix together to make an evenly mixed marinade. Place pre-cut tofu into containers. Cover tofu with marinade. Place Tupperware top or plastic wrap over container and put in refrigerator for 1 to 2 hrs (okay to set overnight!). Preheat oven to 375 degrees and pre-grease a baking sheet. Once tofu is marinated, place tofu strips on greased baking sheet. Place in oven for 15-17 min. When tofu is golden, remove baking sheet from oven, and turn tofu to other side. Replace pan back in oven for additional 15-17 min. When golden, remove heet and let tofu cool for 2-3 minutes.

Enjoy your tofu links beside pancakes, waffles, tofu scramble, or eat alone! It's a savory breakfast treat!

Nutritional Information

Calories: 208 kcal
Fat: 15 gm
Protein: 11gm
Fiber: 2gm
Sodium: 267 gm
Sugars: 7gm
Calcium: 45 % DV
Iron: 10% DV


3) FAQS ABOUT VITAMIN D

By Reed Mangels, PhD, RD

This article originally appeared in Vegetarian Journal Issue 2 2009 [ http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2009issue2/index.php ].

Vitamin D has been in the news a lot lately. Researchers are looking at whether it plays a role in a multitude of diseases ranging from multiple sclerosis to depression to cancer. Vitamin D has long been known to be important for bone health and is being added to foods like orange juice and to many brands of calcium supplements. Vitamin D has always been looked on as an unusual vitamin because, unlike any other nutrient, our bodies can actually make a substantial amount of vitamin D. Add in the fact that it acts more like a hormone than a vitamin, and you can see why there's a lot to know about vitamin D.

We've recently heard from several readers who have had their blood checked for vitamin D and were surprised to learn that they were considered vitamin D deficient. They wrote asking us about vegan sources of vitamin D, the role of sunlight exposure, and what kind of supplements to use. We realized that it's a good time to answer some questions about vitamin D.

What Does Vitamin D Do?

Vitamin D is best known for its role in bone health - it helps our body absorb calcium. When vitamin D is deficient, we absorb very little calcium. That's the main reason that calcium supplements often also contain vitamin D. If calcium is not absorbed due to a vitamin D deficiency, the result is weaker bones that are more likely to fracture.

More recent studies also suggest that older people with lower blood levels of vitamin D are more likely to lose their balance and fall, possibly because of vitamin D's role in promoting muscle function.1 Higher blood levels of vitamin D have been associated with a lower risk of colon and breast cancer in some age groups.2

In addition, lower rates of heart attacks, strokes, multiple sclerosis, arthritis, and depression have also been reported in people with higher blood levels of vitamin D.2,3

Read the the rest of the article on the VRG Blog [ http://www.vrg.org/blog/2010/09/21/faqs-about-vitamin-d/ ] to learn the answer to such questions as:

  • Where Do We Get Vitamin D?
  • How Much Vitamin D Do We Need?
  • Can We Get Too Much Vitamin D from Food or from Supplements? Will Our Bodies Make Too Much Vitamin D?
  • Is Vitamin D a Special Concern for Vegans?
  • What Happens If Someone Doesn't Get Enough Vitamin D?
  • What's The Difference Between Vitamin D2 and Vitamin D3?
  • What About Vitamin D For Breast-fed Babies?
  • Vitamin D Sources for Vegans
  • A List of Vegan Supplements

4) VANCE'S "VEGAN FRIENDLY" DARIFREE MILK CONTAINS VITAMIN D FROM LANOLIN

by Jeanne Yacoubou, MS
VRG Research Director

In July 2010, a regulatory compliance analyst from a private industry recently asked us to look into Vance's DariFree Milk, touted on its website as "vegan friendly." She noticed that it contained vitamin D3, which is most often derived from lanolin (sheep's wool).

We spoke with the Director of Marketing at Vance's Foods several times about its source of vitamin D3 in order to achieve greater clarity on this issue. Initially, The VRG was told that the vitamin D3 in Vance's DariFree Milk "was not derived from sheep's wool; was not from lanolin." It was stated that the source of the vitamin D3 was "synthetic."

The VRG further inquired about the meaning of the word "synthetic" and was told that it was "synthetic due to the chemical reaction it undergoes during processing." The VRG asked about the nature of these chemical reactions. It was later clarified by the Director of Marketing at Vance's Foods that lanolin was the starting material of the vitamin D3 in the DariFree Milk.

After this acknowledgment, Vance's presented us with this statement from the supplier of their vitamin D3. It reads: "only carriers of plant or synthetic origin are present in the D3 formulation." The VRG again inquired about this statement in light of the previous statement that lanolin, which is neither of plant or synthetic origin, was the starting material of the vitamin D3 in the DariFree Milk.

In part, the statement received from Vance's Director of Marketing in early September 2010 read: "the vitamin D3 used in DariFree is made synthetically through chemical processes, rather than derived directly from plants or other materials. This process begins with a by-product created when cleaning sheep's wool; however, there is no animal or wool in the vitamin D3... We appreciate the many Vegans and Vegetarians that enjoy and promote DariFree. However, Vance's Foods does not get involved or take sides with the many different philosophies/lifestyles of Veganism and Vegetarianism."


5) VEGAN WITH BRACES

by Reed Mangels, PhD, RD

I'm getting braces in a couple of weeks. My orthodontist gave me a booklet about what to eat when my mouth hurts and there's not much I can eat (I'm vegan). What do you suggest?

  • Soy yogurt
  • Mashed potatoes (make these easily by microwaving a potato, removing
  • the peel, mashing it with a fork, adding unsweetened soymilk until it's a consistency you can eat, and flavoring it with soy margarine and salt and pepper to taste. Try this same idea with a sweet potato.
  • Applesauce
  • Canned peaches or pears
  • Smoothie made with soymilk, silken tofu, soft fruit (like berries), and frozen bananas. You can add maple syrup or another sweetener or peanut butter to taste. See what flavor you can invent!
  • Soups - try Amy's canned soups or homemade lentil, vegetable, or other soup. Many non-veg soup recipes can be adjusted to use vegetable broth or stock in place of animal broth, soymilk in place of cow's milk, and beans or tofu cubes in place of meat.
  • Soft pasta or couscous
  • Scrambled tofu
  • Hummus or other bean dips (eat with a spoon instead of dipping crackers or raw veggies until your mouth feels better)
  • Refried beans
  • Vegetarian baked beans
  • Oatmeal or other hot cereal
  • Juice pops (freeze juice in small cups with a popsicle stick holder)
  • Frozen desserts
  • Pudding - look for a simple pudding recipe where you can substitute soy or rice milk for cow's milk; instant pudding mix does not seem to work with soymilk
  • Fruit or vegetable juice
  • Ramen noodles (look for a brand without animal-ingredients). Add small cubes of tofu and/or frozen mixed vegetables to the cooking water.

Click here [ http://www.vrg.org/teen ] for more Teen FAQs.


6) VRG'S VEGAN DINNER IN BOSTON 11/7/10

VEGAN DINNER

Sunday, November 7, 2010, 6 PM
MY THAI CAFE
CHINATOWN, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

The Vegetarian Resource Group will hold a vegan dinner during the American Dietetic Association Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo. Dietitians, VRG members, and the public are invited. Come and meet the dietitians from the ADA Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group. Please reserve early. Hope to see you there.

MENU
Thai Coconut Soup with Tofu
Thai Mango Salad
Yellow Curry with brown rice
Wide Rice Noodles with Chinese Broccoli and Gluten
Fresh Fruit Cocktail
Jasmine tea

This vegan restaurant also sells unique vegan Bubble Tea and vegan cakes. You may want to order takeout after the meal to sample these treats.

COST: $25. Children 12 and under are $12. Includes tax and tip. PAYMENT MUST BE MADE IN ADVANCE. Menu subject to change.

Call (410) 366-8343 between 9 AM and 5 PM Eastern Time Monday to Friday; fax (410) 366-8804; click on the donation button at [ http://www.vrg.org ] and write "ADA Dinner" in the notes section; or send a check to VRG, P.O. Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203.

NAMES:
NUMBER ATTENDING: x $25/person $ Enclosed
NAMES ATTENDING:
ADDRESS:
STATE/ZIP
E-MAIL:
PHONE:
DONATION:
TOTAL ENCLOSED:


7) QUESTIONS ABOUT THE UNITED NATIONS' LIVESTOCK'S LONG SHADOW

by Jeanne Yacoubou, MS
VRG Research Director

Background: Dr. Frank Mitloehner's October 2009 scientific paper, co-authored with Dr. Maurice Pitesky and Dr. Kimberly Stackhouse, and his presentation at the March 2010 American Chemical Society meeting, titled Clearing the Air: Livestock's Contribution to Climate Change (Adv. in Ag. 103: 3-40), have raised questions about the validity and accuracy of the United Nations' (UN) Food and Agricultural Organization's (FAO) 2006 report titled Livestock's Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options (herein noted as Long Shadow). In response to many inquiries about the impact of this criticism on the claims made in Long Shadow, The VRG addresses some questions on this issue.

Read more on the VRG Blog: [ http://www.vrg.org/blog/2010/08/17/frequently-asked-questions-about-the-controversy-surrounding-the-united-nations-livestocks-long-shadow-and-responses/ ]


8) LESSON PLAN: WATER CONSERVATION AND DIETARY CONNECTIONS (GRADES 5-8)

Click here [ http://www.vrg.org/environment/5-8_lesson_plan_water_conservation.php ] to view VRG's lesson plan for kids grades 5-8 about water usage.


9) 3RD EDITION OF DIETITIAN'S GUIDE TO VEGETARIAN DIETS

See below for announcement for the 3rd edition of the Dietitian's Guide to Vegetarian Diets. This goes out to faculty everywhere who've expressed an interest in Jones and Bartlett books. We're thrilled accurate information on vegetarianism is being distributed to professors and nutrition students around the country.

AVAILABLE: 9/30/10 Dietitian's Guide to Vegetarian Diets, Third Edition [ http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0763779768?ie=UTF8&tag=httpwwwvrgorg-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0763779768 ]

Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, The Vegetarian Resource Group
Virginia Messina, MPH, RD, Nutrition Matters, Inc.
Mark Messina, PhD, Nutrition Matters, Inc

Evidence-based and thoroughly referenced, this text includes case-studies, sample menus, and counseling points to help readers apply material to the real world.

ISBN: 9780763779764
Paperback, 536 pages, ©2011


10) HOW DO I GAIN WEIGHT AS A VEGETARIAN ATHLETE?

by Julia Driggers, RD

For starters, gaining weight for a vegetarian athlete is the same as gaining weight for any athlete. First, you want to look at what you are eating, how much, and your training routine. To gain weight at your current activity level, all you need to do is simply add extra calories to your diet. In general, an extra 250 to 500 calories per day can lead to a 1/2 to 1 pound weight gain, respectively, per week. For example, if you eat the way you usually do, but add an extra 250 calories everyday for a week, at the end of that week you should gain 1/2 pound. Similarly, if you eat the way you usually do, plus an extra 500 calories everyday for a week, by the end of that week you should gain 1 pound. The amount of calories you choose to add are based upon the amount of weight you want to gain. If you desire to gain less than 10 pounds add an extra 250 calories to your daily intake. If you desire to gain more than 10 pounds, add an extra 500 calories to your daily intake.

Adding calories to your diet is easy. All you have to do is add more snacks throughout the day or add extra calories to the foods you eat. It is important that you add calories with healthy items to provide more vitamins and other nutrients in your diet. Below is a list of 250 calorie and 500 calorie healthy snack ideas. Try adding one or more of these ideas every day to help gain weight. Also listed are ways to add calories to your foods. When you don't have time for snacking, this is a good way to increase the calories in your food without having to plan another meal.

There is no need to eat more than 500 extra calories per day for higher weight gain. Evidence has shown that exceeding more than 500 calories per day and gaining more than 1 pound per week is not beneficial to the athlete. A greater than 1 pound weight gain a week can lead to an increase in fat mass and a reduction in muscle mass. Extra body fat and less lean muscle can slow an athlete down and make it harder to compete. Once you reach your goal weight, continue to eat about the same amount to maintain your weight gain.

If your training routine becomes more intense, you will need to increase the amount of calories you are eating just to maintain your weight. If you are increasing your caloric intake, but are still having a hard time gaining weight during training, you may need to focus more on increasing calories during your off-season. During your off-season you lead a more relaxed life style and it's easier to put on pounds. To gain weight during this time, simply follow the recommendations for adding calories.

250 Calorie Snack Ideas

  • 2 Slices Whole Wheat Bread WITH 1 Tbs Peanut Butter, 1 Tbs Jelly
  • 1 cup Orange Juice with Calcium AND 6 oz Soy Yogurt
  • 1 Odwalla Bar
  • 1 Clif Bar
  • 1 Whole Wheat Pita Pocket WITH 5 Tbs Hummus
  • 1/2 cup Guacamole WITH 1-1/2 cup Celery Sticks AND 1/2 cup Soy Milk
  • 1 Medium Apple WITH 1 Tbs Almond Butter
  • 1/4 cup Mixed Nuts WITH 1-1/2 Tbs Raisins
  • 1 Crunchy Granola Bar AND 1/2 cup Soy Milk
  • 1 oz Hard Pretzels AND 1 cup 100% Cranberry Juice

500 Calorie Snack Ideas

  • 1 Whole Wheat Bagel WITH 2 Tbs Almond Butter, 1/2 Medium Sliced Banana
  • Fruit Smoothie WITH 1-1/2 cup Soy Milk, 1 cup Orange Juice with Calcium, 1 Medium Banana, 10 Large Strawberries, 1 cup Blueberries
  • 1/2 cup Almonds WITH 1/4 cup Dried Cranberries
  • 1 Whole Wheat English Muffin WITH 2 Tbs Earth Balance Margarine, 2 Tbs Jelly AND 1/2 cup Soy Milk
  • 3/4 cup Black Bean Dip WITH 1 cup Tortilla Chips
  • 1 Slice Wheat Bread WITH 1 Tbs Peanut Butter AND 1 cup Sweetened Applesauce AND 1 cup Soy Milk
  • 10 Whole Wheat Crackers (Triscut) WITH 1/2 cup of Hummus
  • 2 cups Lentil Soup AND 1 Whole Wheat Roll AND 1/2 cup Orange Juice with Calcium

Tips for Adding Calories to Foods

  1. Add Earth's Best Margarine or other vegan margarine (100 calories per tablespoon), Flax Seed Oil (120 calories per tablespoon) or Canola Oil (120 calories per table spoon) to stir-frys, sandwiches, vegetables, cooked cereal, breads, pasta, and rice.
  2. Add Wheat Germ (25 calories per tablespoon) to hot cereals, pastry, cake, and pancake batters and casseroles.
  3. Add Veganaise or Oil-based Salad Dressing (90 calories per tablespoon) to sandwiches, salads, and sauces on cooked vegetables.
  4. Add Vegan "Sour Cream" (43 calories per tablespoon) and Vegan "Cheeses" (50 calories per oz) to potatoes, casseroles, dips, sauces and baked goods.
  5. Add Silk Soy Creamer (15 calories per tablespoon, 240 calories per cup) to smoothies, hot and cold cereals, pastry, cake, and pancake batters, and puddings.
  6. Add Nuts (82 calories per 1/2 oz) and Dried Fruit (86 calories per 1/2 cup) to hot and cold cereals, yogurts, salads, cooked vegetables, and stir-frys.

11) VRG ORGANIZATION TIMELINE

Recently we were reflecting on VRG's history and the wonderful things we've been able to do, with your help, in the past almost 30 years. To support VRG's projects such as the ones below, click here [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ].


12) DONATING STOCK TO THE VRG

The below is excerpted from the article Donating Stock To The VRG [ http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2002issue2/2002issue2donate.htm ] by Roger Lowe.

The purpose of this article is to encourage you to consider creative ways to donate to The Vegetarian Resource Group or other nonprofits for outreach projects. It is not intended to be used for financial, tax, or legal advice. Each person's financial and tax situation is unique, and the information in this article may not apply to your situation. Please note that there are numerous proposed tax laws that may change, or may have changed as of the printing of this article.

Before donating stock to The VRG or any other nonprofit, you may want to consult with a financial or tax professional to discuss how such actions may affect your tax liabilities.

Read the rest of the article on the VRG Blog [ http://www.vrg.org/blog/2010/09/09/donating-stock-to-the-vrg/ ] to learn such things as:

  • How To Donate Stock
  • How Donating Stock May Increase The Size of Your Gift
  • How to realize Substantial Tax Savings
  • When Not To Donate Stock

13) VRG AT HAMPDENFEST, IN BALTIMORE

Franck is from France and taking time off from his professional career so he can learn about vegetarianism in America, as well as improve his English. His goal is to use his skills and the knowledge learned from volunteering to promote veganism in France.

Well, this was my first exhibition with The Vegetarian Resource Group. I was quite anxious about my capacity to be understood by all these people. The familial atmosphere and the sunny weather sure helped.

Our booth was located just next to one selling vegan pastries...What a coincidence. And it'd been (extremely) difficult to resist all the day. A lot of people stopped by our booth. Many were already vegetarian or vegan. Some who weren't vegetarian at all used to have a friend or a relative that was. Or they thought with reason that they could lose weight and get healthier that way. With Ann-Marie, we tried to comfort them and to emphasize that they should aim for a few vegetarian meals a week first, and of course check the vrg.org site to find information and recipes.

There were many people that were interested in what we were doing and even upon arrival in the morning, the Baltimore HampdenFest coordinator said how excited everyone was that VRG was setting up for today. There were many festival-goers that stopped, veg*n and not, that wanted more information and support, and we were able to provide that. Most of them were Baltimoreans who wanted to get involved with VRG in one way or another.

Most of the question were about recipes and the activities of VRG. The books, brochures and especially the guide to the vegetarian restaurants were incredibly successful. More than 40 people subscribed to our email list.

Unfortunately, but this was predictable, we had no questions about ethics nor environment and only a very few about nutritional facts (protein myth, B12).

It was overall a great day and we look forward to the next HampdenFest!

If you would like to volunteer to help with vegetarian outreach, please e-mail vrg@vrg.org.


14) LESSON PLAN: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SURFACE WATER QUALITY WITH DIETARY CONNECTIONS (GRADES 9-12)

Click here [ http://www.vrg.org/environment/9-12_lesson_plan_water.php ] to see the lesson plan.


15) SHOP AT THEVEGETARIANSITE AND SUPPORT THE VRG!

For the month of October, TheVegetarianSite [ http://thevegetariansite.com ] will donate a portion of your purchase to The VRG. TheVegetarianSite offers non-leather shoes and clothing, cruelty free personal care products, books, videos, food, and more. We thank them, and we'd like to thank you for supporting The Vegetarian Resource Group!


16) PRE-THANKSGIVING VEGETARIAN POTLUCK

The Vegetarian Resource Group's annual Pre-Thanksgiving potluck dinner is on Sunday, November 21st at 5:00 p.m. The event will be held at the charming and historic North Baltimore Mennonite Church, 4615 Roland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21210.

Join us as we show our thanks for turkeys and all living creatures by not eating them.

Admission is $4 per adult; children are admitted free.

Please bring a vegan dish that serves four as a contribution from EACH member of your party. Write the ingredients of your dish on a 3" x 5" card to accommodate guests with special diets. Also, please bring a serving utensil for each dish. Paper plates, cups, napkins, and plastic utensils will be provided; however, we suggest participants please bring their own reusable dishes and utensils in order to reduce waste.

If you are unable to cook, you may bring a prepared vegan dish for four from a local natural foods store or restaurant. We also encourage you to bring a non-perishable vegetarian canned food item to donate to North Baltimore Mennonite Church, who will distribute it to those in need.

Please call The Vegetarian Resource Group at (410) 366-8343 if you need any more information about this event.


17) PART-TIME JOB AVAILABLE

Vegan group seeks Jack or Jill of all trades good at multi tasking for part-time job 29 hours per week in Baltimore, Maryland. Staff person clerically and physically ships vegan books, Vegetarian Journal, and other educational materials throughout the country. See [ http://www.vrg.org/catalog/ ].

Does the billing, packing, mailing and marketing of items to consumers and wholesalers.

Coordinates volunteers doing booths, events, and other activities around the country. Answers consumer and media questions.

Please send resume, writing samples, and cover letter addressing your short term and long term goals, interests, vegetarian and vegan knowledge, skills strengths, and challenges to vrg@vrg.org


ABOUT THE VEGETARIAN RESOURCE GROUP

Our health professionals, activists, and educators work with businesses and individuals to bring about healthful changes in your school, workplace, and community. Registered dietitians and physicians aid in the development of nutrition-related publications and answer member and media questions about vegetarian diets. The Vegetarian Resource Group is a non-profit organization. Financial support comes primarily from memberships, donations, bequests, and book sales. The Vegetarian Journal, a print magazine, is a benefit of membership in The VRG. (For more information, please see the Vegetarian Journal online.)

If you would like to make a donation, become a member, volunteer, or find out more about The VRG, contact us at:

The Vegetarian Resource Group P.O. Box 1463 Baltimore, MD 21203 Phone: (410) 366-8343 Fax: (410) 366-8804 E-mail: vrg@vrg.org Website: [ http://www.vrg.org ] Donate: [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?Action=GC&CID=1561 ]

The contents of this newsletter, and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your own best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.


ABOUT VRG-NEWS

VRG-NEWS is the e-mail newsletter of The Vegetarian Resource Group. This is an announcement list so subscriber messages are not accepted by the list. If you have a technical question about the list, please contact us at vrg@vrg.org. If you have any suggestions, ideas, or corrections to VRG-NEWS, please direct them to vrg@vrg.org. Thanks!

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Contents of VRG-NEWS are copyright 2010 by The Vegetarian Resource Group. The newsletter may be freely distributed in electronic or print form provided its contents are not altered and credit is given to The Vegetarian Resource Group, P.O. Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203.