VRG-NEWS: The Vegetarian Resource Group Newsletter
Volume 15, Issue 8
August 2011

CONTENTS

  1. VRG'S PARENT'S LISTSERV
  2. VEGAN AT COLLEGE 101
  3. VEGAN VERSION OF USDA MYPLATE NOW AVAILABLE AS FULL-COLOR HANDOUT AND COLORING PAGE
  4. VEGAN RESTAURANTS AROUND THE U.S.
  5. DONATE TO VRG THROUGH THE COMBINED FEDERAL CAMPAIGN (CFC
  6. WHAT IS ANNATTO?
  7. AN UPDATE ON SUBWAY BREADS: CHANGES WITH VITAMIN D3 AND L-CYSTEINE
  8. LESSON PLANS
  9. NATURAL FLAVOR IN KASHI
  10. UPDATE ON MOE'S
  11. VRG'S VEGAN INDIAN DINNER IN SAN DIEGO, SEPT 25
  12. CALCIUM FORTIFIED ORANGE JUICE WITHOUT VITAMIN D
  13. VEGAN CHILDREN 1.5 TO 2.5 YEARS OF AGE WANTED FOR A RESEARCH STUDY
  14. VEGAN STRAWBERRY PANCAKES
  15. CHEAP, EASY VEGAN CAMPING FOOD
  16. CALIFORNIA PIZZA KITCHEN'S VEGETARIAN & VEGAN INFORMATION
  17. THE VEGETARIAN RESOURCE GROUP AT SHIP
  18. JOIN VRG WITH $25 AND GET A COPY OF MEATLESS MEALS FOR FREE!
  19. VRG'S VISA PLATINUM REWARDS CARD
  20. ANNUAL PRE-THANKSGIVING DAY VEGAN POTLUCK -- NOVEMBER 20, 2011
  21. About The Vegetarian Resource Group
  22. About VRG-NEWS

1) VRG'S PARENT'S LISTSERV

Are you raising a vegetarian or vegan child? If so, The Vegetarian Resource Group invites you to be a part of a network of vegetarian parents interested in exchanging ideas on various topics such as creating tasty snacks for toddlers, the challenges of non-vegetarian family/friend gatherings, how to talk with your child about vegetarianism, helping kids handle peer pressure, even shopping resources for leather/wool alternatives!

The list was founded in 2000, and currently has 1665 members.

For more information and to join, click here [ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vrgparents/ ].


2) VEGAN AT COLLEGE 101

Vegan at College 101 Tips from People Who Know

By Jessica Friend and Lindsey Siferd

The Vegetarian Resource Group has compiled a list of tips to help you survive (and thrive!) as a vegan college student. We interviewed thirteen current students at various universities around the country about their experiences as being vegan at college. They are a diverse group of students-- some go to large universities and some are at small colleges. Some have been vegan since birth, some started more recently. A few are even leaders of vegetarian and/or animal rights groups, but all are activists in some way. They all had advice to share for incoming and current students who wish to live a vegan lifestyle at school.

Read the full article on The VRG Blog: [ http://www.vrg.org/blog/2011/07/29/vegan-at-college-101/ ]


3) VEGAN VERSION OF USDA MYPLATE NOW AVAILABLE AS FULL-COLOR HANDOUT AND COLORING PAGE

A vegan version of the USDA MyPlate is now available in two versions online: a full-color handout and coloring page.

The handout is perfect for any vegan or vegetarian, and also useful for dietitians. The coloring page is great for parents, teachers, students, and kids of all ages.

You can find a pdf of both the full-color handout and the coloring page under the "Guides and Handouts" and the "Teens, Family, and Kids" section of the VRG website.

http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/ ]
http://www.vrg.org/family/kidsindex.htm ]

The handout and coloring page were designed by Lindsey Siferd, a VRG summer intern. If you are interested in becoming an intern with the VRG, please visit [ http://www.vrg.org/student/index.php ] for more information.


4) VEGAN RESTAURANTS AROUND THE U.S.

These vegan restaurants were recently added to our online restaurant guide. To find restaurants in your area, visit: [ http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php ]

Garden Secrets Restaurant
538 W. Grand Ave., Hot Springs, AR 71901
(501) 623-9700
http://gardensecretsrestaurant.com/ ]
Vegan/international. Garden Secrets offers an all-vegan menu of American, Mexican, Chinese, and Italian cuisines. Enjoy wraps, subs, burgers, soups, salads, and entrees. Garden Secrets is located near the heart of Hot Springs and just around the corner from Bathhouse Row and Hot Springs National Park. Open Sunday through Thursday for lunch and dinner. Open Friday for lunch. Closed Saturday. Full service, take-out, catering, smoothies, VISA/MC/AMEX/DISC, $-$$.

Like No Udder
Providence, RI 02903
(401) 419-8869
http://www.like-no-udder.com/ ]
Vegan/ice cream/food truck. Like No Udder is a vegan soft serve ice cream truck! Serving various locations and events in Providence and beyond, visit their website to track them in (almost) real time and to view their calendar of events. In addition to non-dairy soft serve, they offer vegan treats including shakes, floats, frozen slushies, and candy bars. During day-long events or festivals, they offer hot food items such as vegan hot dogs and vegan meatball subs. No hydrogenated ingredients are ever used. Cash only. Hours vary. Take-out, catering, special beverages, $.

Loving Hut
2842 Rogers Dr., Falls Church, VA 22042
(703) 942-5622
http://www.lovinghut.us/fallschurch_01/ ]
Vegan/Asian/American. Loving Hut is an international vegan restaurant chain with the slogan, "Be Veg. Go Green. Save the Planet." They offer gourmet vegan cuisine "for those making the noble transition to a plant-based diet." Although the menu varies by location, it typically includes appetizers, soups, salads, entrees, desserts, and special beverages. Both Asian and American meals are served including mock meat and vegetable dishes. Loving Hut was created with a vision that all beings could live in peace, love, and harmony with each other and the planet. Open Thursday through Tuesday for lunch and dinner. Closed Wednesday. Full service, take-out, special beverages, VISA/MC, $.

Please help us keep our restaurant guide current and accurate. Restaurants continually change locations, new ones open, and others close. To let us know about any restaurants we should add, delete, or if our existing entry should be changed, please complete the form here: [ http://www.vrg.org/travel/restupdate.php ]

If you would like to volunteer with maintaining and updating The Vegetarian Resource Group restaurant guide, email us at vrg@vrg.org [ mailto:vrg@vrg.org ]. Thank you!


5) DONATE TO VRG THROUGH THE COMBINED FEDERAL CAMPAIGN (CFC)

Federal government employees can support The Vegetarian Resource Group through the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC). Look for us under Health & Medical Research Charities of America.

We are also participating in the California State Employees Charitable Campaign. If you are a California State employee, please support Vegetarian Resource Group outreach.

Please also remember VRG in other workplace fund drives, matching gifts, etc.!


6) WHAT IS ANNATTO?

Our Guide to Food Ingredients, which is very helpful in deciphering ingredients like "annatto," is now available in many different formats!

Get it in print
http://www.vrg.org/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=8 ]

online
http://www.vrg.org/ingredients/index.php ]

iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guidetoveganandvegetarianfoodingredients/id443466136?mt=8 ]

and on Windows Phone 7
http://social.zune.net/redirect?type=phoneApp&id=06ad6608-369f-e011-986b-78e7d1fa76f8 ]

Annatto
Also known as: annatto extract, annatto seed, norbixin.
Commercial source: vegetable.
Used in: margarine, shortening, cheese, seasonings, sausage casings.
Definition: A natural yellow-orange food coloring derived from a tree seed.
Vegan

Your support allows us to continue this ingredient research and make updates as new information arises. Please consider making a donation [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ].


7) AN UPDATE ON SUBWAY BREADS: CHANGES WITH VITAMIN D3 AND L-CYSTEINE

by Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

VRG Research Director

August 5, 2011 - The VRG noticed for the first time in May 2011 that the United States Product Ingredients Statement on Subway's website indicated that the Flatbread, Italian White Bread, Hearty Italian Bread, Roasted Garlic Bread, and the Nine-Grain Wheat Bread contained vitamin D3. We asked Subway what the source of their vitamin D3 was. Typically vitamin D3 is derived from lanolin (coating on sheep's wool).

We were informed in May 2011 that the vitamin D3 source was "in transition." In July 2011, we received word from a senior staff member at Subway that Subway restaurants would carry Flatbread, Italian White Bread, Hearty Italian Bread, Roasted Garlic Bread, and Nine-Grain Wheat Bread containing vitamin D2 "at all locations in a few weeks." Vitamin D2 is derived from a fungal source.

As of this writing, the Subway website still lists vitamin D3 for these breads. Readers should note the disclaimer at the top of the Ingredients Statement which states that "Every effort is made to keep this information current. However it is possible that ingredient changes and substitutions may occur before this list is updated."

Although in May 2011, according to its website, Subway's Flatbread contained L-cysteine, (often derived from human hair or duck feathers), we were informed later in May 2011 that "L-cysteine is no longer in the Flatbread." It has since been removed from the website Ingredient Statement. Subway patrons may note that the Flatbread contains a milk product.

All other ingredients in the Italian White Bread, Hearty Italian Bread, and Roasted Garlic Bread, are "plant-derived" including several ingredients which, in other food items, are sometimes derived from animal products. In the Italian White Bread, Hearty Italian Bread, and Roasted Garlic Bread, these ingredients include mono- and diglycerides, amylase, and sodium stearoyl lactylate.

Although vegetable-derived sodium stearoyl lactylate and natural flavor are in the Nine-Grain Wheat Bread, this bread contains honey.

Interested readers may also like to know that the mono- and diglycerides in the Wrap and the Sourdough Bread at Subway are all-vegetable. The sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate and amylase in the Sourdough Bread are also vegetable-derived. The Light Wheat English Muffin is all-vegetable.

Besides the all-vegetable Subway bread products described here, all other Subway breads contain milk products or honey. To summarize:

All-Plant Derived Subway Bread Products

Italian White Bread
Hearty Italian White Bread
Light Wheat English Muffin
Roasted Garlic Bread
Sourdough Bread


8) LESSON PLANS

For teachers and students preparing for the upcoming school year, here are some of VRG's lesson plans:

Lesson Plan: Clean Water for Everyone Today and Tomorrow with Good Food Choices
http://www.vrg.org/environment/K-2_lesson_plan_clean_water.php ]
(grades K-2)

Lesson Plan: Water Conservation and Dietary Connections
http://www.vrg.org/environment/5-8_lesson_plan_water_conservation.php ]
(grades 5-8)

Lesson Plan: A Comparative Study of Surface Water Quality with Dietary Connections
http://www.vrg.org/environment/9-12_lesson_plan_water.php ]
(grades 9-12)

Water Usage Math Worksheet
http://www.vrg.org/environment/water_usage_math_worksheet1.php ]
(Middle/High School Level)

"Teach... Your Children Well...": A vegetarian Lesson Plan for High School Students
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2009issue1/vj2009issue1vegy101.htm ]


9) NATURAL FLAVOR IN KASHIŽ AUTUMN WHEAT CEREAL IS ALL-VEGETABLE; NO BONE CHAR USED

by Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

VRG Research Director

A concerned reader wrote to The VRG in June 2011 asking about the natural flavor listed as an ingredient in Kashi's® Whole Wheat Biscuits Autumn Wheat® cold cereal. He asked The VRG to look into the matter.

We emailed and called Kashi® about the natural flavor in the Autumn Wheat® cereal and received quick responses as well as a follow-up call back by the same consumer specialist one day after our initial inquiry. Victor told us that the natural flavor in the Autumn Wheat® cereal is "natural maple brown sugar flavor" composed of "maple syrup and brown sugar." Victor added that "barley malt flavor is added to enhance the flavor of both." According to Victor, Kashi's® Autumn Wheat® cereal is all-vegetable.

The VRG further inquired about the processing method for the brown sugar. Victor called me back to say that no cow bone char was used to filter the brown sugar.

We also received an email from Rick, another Kashi® consumer specialist, who wrote generally about Kashi's® natural flavors: "The natural flavors we use in our products are a proprietary blend of plant and/or herb extracts, nothing from any animal, egg, or dairy origin. All of the ingredients are natural and do not contain MSG."

Visit our blog to see the list of Kashi products that do not contain ingredients derived from animals:

http://www.vrg.org/blog/2011/08/12/natural-flavor-in-kashiŽ-autumn-wheat-cereal-is-all-vegetable-no-bone-char-used/ ]

For more information about ingredients, see:
http://www.vrg.org/ingredients/index.php ]
http://www.vrg.org/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=8 ]
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guidetoveganandvegetarianfoodingredients/id443466136?mt=8 ]
http://www.vrg.org/mobile_apps.php ]

Your support allows us to continue this ingredient research and make updates as new information arises. Please consider making a donation.
https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ]

The contents of this website and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.


10) UPDATE ON MOE'S® SOUTHWEST GRILL: BLACK BEANS ARE ALL-VEGETABLE; HONEY IN WHOLE GRAIN TORTILLA

by Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

VRG Research Director

A reader contacted The VRG in July 2011 telling us that she had heard reports from a manager at her local Moe's® Southwest Grill in Florida that the black beans at that restaurant chain possibly contained non-vegetarian calcium stearate. She also had heard that the whole grain tortilla contained honey. The reader asked The VRG to confirm if this information was true.

We contacted the Moe's® manager asking him for more information regarding the black bean seasoning. He learned from a senior level employee at Moe's® that the calcium stearate in the black bean seasoning was all-vegetable. A Singapore company which manufactures the calcium stearate used in the black bean seasoning sent an official declaration letter to him stating that "stearic acid, the raw material for the calcium stearate, is of vegetable-based origin (palm oil)."

The VRG also received confirmation from Moe's® Southwest Grill that honey is an ingredient in the whole grain tortilla.

A manager at Moe's® Southwest Grill told The VRG that all-vegetable bread products are available at Moe's®. He stated that "the flour tortillas are vegan but contain enriched flour....Tacos can be made on a fried corn tortilla or a soft corn tortilla. All items can also be made without a tortilla."

In a follow-up email requesting further clarification on the all-vegetable tortillas at Moe's®, the manager told us that "whole wheat tortillas can be used for burritos and quesadillas. Corn tortillas can be used for tacos. Flour is the "standard" tortilla and can be used for any entree. Of these, only the whole wheat [tortilla] is non-vegan."

Concerning other menu items at Moe's®, The VRG was informed by the Florida Moe's® manager that he has "...checked our pinto bean seasonings and they are vegan, as well as the rice and pico de gallo (all of which have their own seasoning additions)."

The contents of this article, our website, and our other publications, including The Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company employees or company statements.Information does change and mistakes are always possible. Please use your own best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. Further research or confirmation may be warranted.

For more information on food ingredients in menu items at quick service and casual dining restaurant chains, please visit our website at: [ http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.htm ]

Your support allows us to continue ingredient research and make updates as new information arises. Please consider making a donation at: [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ]


11) VRG'S VEGAN INDIAN DINNER IN SAN DIEGO, SEPT 25

VEGAN INDIAN DINNER
Sunday, September 25, 2011, 6:30 pm
San Diego, CA
Royal India, 329 Market Street

Sponsored by The Vegetarian Resource Group during the American Dietetic Association Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo Meet Reed Mangels, PhD, RD, Catherine Conway, MS, RD, and other vegetarian dietitians.

BUFFET MENU:
Salad
Samosas
Veggie Pakora
Aloo Gobi
Bengan Bhartha
Green Beans Masala
Veggie Mango Pineapple
Channa Masala
Peas Pulao Rice
Rice
Salad

RESERVATIONS AND PAYMENT MUST BE MADE IN ADVANCE. Refunds will only be made if we can replace your seat.

Name: Address: City: State: Telephone: E-mail: Attendees: ___ Number of adults X $25 before August 20, 2011= $_____ ___ Number of adults X $35 after August 20, 2011= $_____ ___ Children X $20= $_____ ___ Donation for outreach to dietitians $_____

Please send payment to The Vegetarian Resource Group, P.O. Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203; Call (410) 366-8343 9-5 AM Eastern Time, Monday to Friday, or pay at online here
https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ]. Please write San Diego dinner in the notes field and the name of attendees. (The early registration price is limited to the first fifty registrants.)


12) CALCIUM FORTIFIED ORANGE JUICE WITHOUT VITAMIN D

Vegans looking for a source of calcium should know that many brands of frozen concentrate orange juice are calcium-fortified but don't list vitamin D on the label. This is in contrast to most cartons of ready-to-serve orange juice which contain both calcium and vitamin D. The vitamin D in cartons of orange juice is typically vitamin D3 (derived from sheep's wool).

Here are some brands of frozen orange juice concentrate that contain calcium, but don't list vitamin D:

  • Giant 100% Pure Orange Juice - Frozen Concentrate with Calcium
  • Minute Maid Frozen Concentrate Orange Juice with Calcium
  • Stop and Shop Frozen Concentrate Orange Juice with Calcium
  • ShopRite Frozen Orange Juice Concentrate with Calcium
  • Old Orchard 100% Juice with Calcium

If you find other brands, please let us know. You may notice that some brands of frozen orange juice contain calcium lactate. This is not a dairy-based ingredient.

Since vitamin D promotes calcium absorption, be sure your diet has vegan sources of vitamin D like fortified plant milks (most use D2) or vitamin D supplements.At least 10 to 15 minutes of summer sun exposure two or three times a week is another way to get the vitamin D that you need. Don't forget the sunscreen once those 10-15 minutes are up!

For more information on ingredients, see
http://www.vrg.org/ingredients/index.php ]

To support Vegetarian Resource Group research and education , you can donate at
https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ]

The contents of this newsletter and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.


13) VEGAN CHILDREN 1.5 TO 2.5 YEARS OF AGE WANTED FOR A RESEARCH STUDY

This study of vegan toddlers is being conducted by researchers at Loma Linda University. Children residing in the U.S. or Canada should be generally healthy, vegan, age 1.5 to 2.5 years, and not currently breastfeeding.

To learn more about the study, go to
https://myllu.llu.edu/apps/public_health/veganchildrenstudy/ ]. For specific inquiries, send email to veganchildrenstudy@llu.edu.


14) VEGAN STRAWBERRY PANCAKES

This article originally appeared in Vegetarian Journal Issue 1, 2009 [ http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2009issue1/index.php ], in the article A Relaxing Weekend Brunch [ http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2009issue1/2009_issue1_weekend_brunch.php ] by Peggy Rynk. To subscribe, either: join VRG online with $25, call us at (410) 366-8343 and order by phone with your Mastercard® or Visa®, or complete this form [ http://www.vrg.org/journal/subscribe.htm ].

Strawberry Pancakes
(Makes approximately 16 pancakes)

These tasty pancakes don't even need syrup, but they are good with syrup, too.

  • 2 cups unbleached flour
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 2 Tablespoons granulated vegan sweetener
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups chopped fresh strawberries
  • 2 1/2cups soymilk
  • 2 Tablespoons canola oil
  • Additional canola oil to prepare griddle

In a medium-sized mixing bowl, blend together the dry ingredients. Add the strawberries and stir until coated with the flour mixture.

Make a well in the center and add the soymilk and oil. Stir to blend well, but do not beat.

Brush a griddle lightly with additional oil. Heat the griddle to medium heat and ladle on the batter, using enough batter to make 4-inch pancakes. Cook over medium heat until lightly browned on the bottom. Flip each pancake over and cook on the other side until lightly browned as well. Remove from griddle and repeat process with more oil and batter until all of the batter has been used. Keep pancakes in a warm oven until all are finished.

Total calories per pancake: 107
Fat: 3 grams
Carbohydrates: 18 grams
Protein: 3 grams
Sodium: 233 milligrams
Fiber: 1 gram


15) CHEAP, EASY VEGAN CAMPING FOOD

I'm spending a month this summer working on a trail crew. I said I'd help plan meals. What are some cheap, easy vegan foods that work for camping?

Vegan marshmallows roasting over the fire are a picture-perfect camping treat. But are you looking for more filling, less pricey alternatives for your next camping trip? The foods below helped sustain me and nine other hungry trail workers this summer, on a budget of less than $5 per person per day.

Oatmeal: If you're only planning for a few days, oatmeal packets are convenient because they come in a variety of flavors. For a longer trip or more people, though, buying instant oatmeal in bulk saves money. Try adding peanut butter, cinnamon, brown sugar, and/or dried fruit.

Soy milk: Since most soy milk only needs refrigeration after it's been opened, two or three people should be able to finish a carton before it goes bad. You may also want to try powdered soy milk, which is fine as an ingredient but tastes grainy and watery to me if I just add water.

Bread: My trail crew baked sandwich bread each night for the next day's lunch. If you have time and a small oven-box that sits on your camp stove, this is a fun way to save money. We used a simple yeast bread recipe--just yeast, sugar, water, flour, and salt--and sometimes mixed in ingredients like cinnamon and raisins for pizzazz. Of course, store-bought sandwich bread is an option as well.

Gorp: A camping classic, gorp technically stands for "good old raisins and peanuts," but often refers to a delicious mixture of nuts, dried fruit, chocolate, and anything else you'd like to add.

Fruits and vegetables: Some types of produce, like apples, citruses, onions, potatoes, and carrots, seem to hold up better than others. My group also ate blueberries, cherries, watermelon, celery, broccoli, corn, and bell peppers. Canned and dried fruits and veggies are great, too.

Peanut butter: Peanut butter is a staple of any camping trip because you can put it on almost anything for more nourishment and flavor--sandwiches, of course, but also apples, tortillas, hot or cold cereal, celery, carrots, chocolate, pasta...

Gado-gado: Although I can't attest to the authenticity of this dish, the peanutty pasta that we called gado-gado was one of my favorite dinners. To make it, cook pasta in one pot and sauté vegetables (like onions, carrots, broccoli, and peppers) in a pan. Mix peanut butter, soy sauce, brown sugar, and hot water until you have a sauce with your desired taste and consistency. Drain the pasta, and add the veggies and sauce, plus crumbled tofu if you'd like.

Burritos: When you're camping, almost anything is fair game to roll up in a tortilla, but I'd recommend rice, beans, salsa, and sautéd veggies such as onions, carrots, corn, canned tomatoes, and/or bell peppers. If you have leftover tortillas, try making breakfast or dessert quesadillas by heating a tortilla with some combination of peanut butter, fruit, and chocolate chips folded inside.

One of the main challenges of camp cooking is the lack of refrigeration. In my experience, some foods that I would refrigerate at home lasted for several days or more at room temperature. However, if you have any concern at all about the safety of a food item, don't eat it.

Written by Sarah Alper, a VRG volunteer and lifelong vegan


16) CALIFORNIA PIZZA KITCHEN'S VEGETARIAN & VEGAN INFORMATION

California Pizza Kitchen [ http://cpk.com/ ] is a casual eatery with restaurant locations across the United States. Their menu of pizza, pasta, salads, sandwiches, and more includes both vegetarian and vegan items. Additionally, CPK's website features 'Vegetarian & Vegan Information,' a 3-page pdf that defines the different types of vegetarians. It also provides guidelines for each type as well as menu items that are acceptable or can be modified (and how to modify them). The document was last updated June 1, 2011 and can be viewed here: [ http://cpk.com/menu/pdfs/vegetarian.pdf ]

For more restaurant information, please check out the following:

Fast Food Information: [ http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.htm ]

Top Restaurant Chains for Vegetarians & Vegans: [ http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/top_restaurant_chains.php ]

A Sample Vegan Meal Plan If You Are Eating at Restaurant Chains: [ http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2009issue3/2009_issue3_sample_chain_vegan_mealplan.php ]


17) THE VEGETARIAN RESOURCE GROUP AT SHIP

By Lindsey Siferd

On Monday, August 1, two other VRG summer interns and I staffed an outreach booth at the School Health Interdisciplinary Program (SHIP) conference in Towson, Maryland. Considering that the last two booths I worked at were an outdoor festival and a farmer's market in Baltimore, this conference was a very different experience.

SHIP was taking place at the Sheraton North Hotel, and I arrived bright and early on Monday morning. The VRG had a table with a tablecloth and comfortable chairs already set up, and I received a nametag as well. Since SHIP is a conference catering to health professionals, teachers, and anyone involved with the school system, we had packed a lot of materials that were directed towards children. I set up our booth with these materials, which included the "I Love Animals and Broccoli Coloring Book" and lesson plans, my new "My Vegan Plate [ http://www.vrg.org/blog/2011/08/01/vegan-version-of-usda-myplate-now-available-as-full-color-handout-and-coloring-page/ ]" coloring page, the vegetarian chapter from the Pediatric Manual of Clinical Dietetics, handouts on veganism in pregnancy and childhood [ http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/veganpregnancy.php&nbs;], being a vegan teenager [ http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/teen_veg.pdf ], and many more. We also had all of our books on display and a colorful VRG sign.

Soon after I set up, the other VRG interns, Jessica and Yasmin, arrived. It was great to do a booth with just interns, because we were able to talk to each other about our experiences with interning this summer, and also share different points of view with the people stopping by our table. Yasmin is a vegan who is head of UMBC's veg club on campus, Jessica is a nutrition major at the University of Maryland, College Park, and I am a vegetarian English major from St. Mary's College of MD, a small liberal arts school. All of these different backgrounds came together in an unique way, and we had many people ask us about why we chose to intern at the VRG and about our experiences with a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle.

Several visitors to the booth were interested in materials for their students, and they were pleased to see materials that dealt with nutrition for children. One woman took a sample of all of our materials, and said she wanted to show these to her contacts in the school system in order to help convince them to serve healthier school lunches. Several also said they wanted to check out our website's section on teens, family, and kids [ http://www.vrg.org/family/kidsindex.htm ].

We were also surprised by the number of people that wanted materials for themselves, or their children or relatives. In this aspect, the SHIP booth was like the other two booths that I worked-- people were personally interested in a meatless lifestyle, and wanted the tools to maintain one. One woman had even subscribed to our journal for several years, and was interested in buying our "Vegans Know How to Party" book for an event she was having later that month.

I think it was important for the VRG to have a table at the SHIP conference-- we were able to reach a group of professionals who work within the school system, many of whom advocate for a healthier lifestyle for their students. Many people expressed their excitement at our presence at the conference, and were glad that we had free Vegetarian Journals and a variety of handouts for them to take. For the interns, it was also a way for us to experience tabling at a professional event, something which we all learned from. I hope that the VRG can continue to table at events like SHIP, and further help those in the school system aid students in pursuing a healthier lifestyle.

If you are interested in volunteering at a booth like the one above, please e-mail vrg@vrg.org. For a list of other ways to volunteer and get involved with the VRG, please visit [ http://www.vrg.org/getinvolved.php ].

Donations from individuals like you help the VRG continue to sponsor outreach booths like the one mentioned above. To donate, please go to [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ].


18) JOIN VRG WITH $25 AND GET A COPY OF MEATLESS MEALS FOR FREE!

Join The VRG with $25 via our donation form [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ], and receive the Vegetarian Journal [ http://www.vrg.org/journal/index.htm ] for one year and a copy of Meatless Meals for Working People: Quick and Easy Vegetarian Recipes!

Meatless Meals for Working People by Debra Wasserman shows you how to be a vegetarian within your hectic schedule. This book features 100 quick and easy recipes, convenient frozen food ideas, and a chapter on fast packaged foods. A vegetarian spice chart, vegan meal plan, and seasonal party ideas for twelve assist the reader who wants to do more.

Fast meals include Rigatoni Combination and Easy Tostadas. Just a few of the lunch ideas are Mock "Tuna" Salad, Rice Burgers, and Corn Fritters. For dessert try Coconut Clusters, Rice Pudding, Fresh Fruit Salad with Peanut Creme, and Spicy Date Nut Spread.


19) VRG'S VISA PLATINUM REWARDS CARD

VRG's affinity Visa® Platinum Rewards credit card is now available!

When a cardholder activates the card, VRG receives $50. Then for the life of the program, VRG will receive a portion of every dollar that each cardholder charges. The VRG Visa® Platinum Rewards card offers qualified cardholders exceptional benefits including no annual fee, a low APR and reward points for shopping at participating merchants.

Add your support with every purchase when you use the The Vegetarian Resource Group Visa® Platinum Rewards card. To apply, see: [ http://www.cardpartner.com/app/vrg ]

For FAQs about the program, see: [ http://www.cardpartner.com/marketing/faq ]


20) ANNUAL PRE-THANKSGIVING DAY VEGAN POTLUCK -- SUNDAY NOVEMBER 20, 2011

Baltimore area vegans and vegetarians, mark your calendar now! The VRG's 2011 Pre-Thanksgiving Vegan Potluck will be held on Sunday November 20th at North Baltimore Mennonite Church in Roland Park, in Baltimore, MD at 5:00PM. Only a few months ahead and planning is underway! Volunteers needed for set-up starting at 3:00PM, to greet guests at the door and host the book table during the dinner, and for clean up after the event.

For more information, email Mary at vrg@vrg.org


ABOUT THE VEGETARIAN RESOURCE GROUP

Our health professionals, activists, and educators work with businesses and individuals to bring about healthful changes in your school, workplace, and community. Registered dietitians and physicians aid in the development of nutrition-related publications and answer member and media questions about vegetarian diets. The Vegetarian Resource Group is a non-profit organization. Financial support comes primarily from memberships, donations, bequests, and book sales. The Vegetarian Journal, a print magazine, is a benefit of membership in The VRG. (For more information, please see the Vegetarian Journal online.)

If you would like to make a donation, become a member, volunteer, or find out more about The VRG, contact us at:

The Vegetarian Resource Group P.O. Box 1463 Baltimore, MD 21203 Phone: (410) 366-8343 Fax: (410) 366-8804 E-mail: vrg@vrg.org Website: [ http://www.vrg.org ] Donate: [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ]

The contents of this newsletter, and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your own best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.


ABOUT VRG-NEWS

VRG-NEWS is the e-mail newsletter of The Vegetarian Resource Group. This is an announcement list so subscriber messages are not accepted by the list. If you have a technical question about the list, please contact us at vrg@vrg.org. If you have any suggestions, ideas, or corrections to VRG-NEWS, please direct them to vrg@vrg.org. Thanks!

If you are a new subscriber, you might enjoy reading past issues of VRG-NEWS online at [ http://www.vrg.org/vrgnews/ ].

If you wish to cancel your subscription to VRG-NEWS, send an e-mail message to listserv@listserv.aol.com with the following message:

SIGNOFF VRG-NEWS

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Contents of VRG-NEWS are copyright 2011 by The Vegetarian Resource Group. The newsletter may be freely distributed in electronic or print form provided its contents are not altered and credit is given to The Vegetarian Resource Group, P.O. Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203.