VRG-NEWS: The Vegetarian Resource Group Newsletter
Volume 15, Issue 1
February 2011

CONTENTS

  1. NEW FORMULATION SKITTLES ARE GELATIN-FREE; STARBURSTS & GUMMIBURSTS CONTAIN NON-KOSHER GELATINS
  2. SUMMER STAFF NEEDED FOR VEGETARIAN KITCHEN IN INTERNATIONAL TEEN CAMP
  3. VEGETARIAN JOURNAL ISSUE 4 2010 NOW ONLINE!
  4. TheEthicalMan.com - VEGAN APPAREL BOUTIQUE FOR MEN
  5. WORKING WITH A CATERER
  6. REMINDER: APPLICATIONS FOR VRG'S $5,000 COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP DUE FEB 20
  7. DO VEGETARIANS AND VEGANS STAY VEGETARIAN? VRG 2006-09 SURVEY
  8. VEGETARIAN JOURNAL'S FOODSERVICE UPDATE PRODUCT LISTING
  9. BOOK REVIEWS
  10. MSG, HYDROLYZED PROTEINS, AND AUTOLYZED YEAST EXTRACTS: CLASSIFIED AS FLAVOR ENHANCERS, NOT NATURAL FLAVORS
  11. SHELLAC ON COFFEE BEANS?
  12. WHAT DO HOME SCHOOLERS AND VEGETARIANS HAVE IN COMMON?
  13. DONATING TO CHARITY FROM IRA'S
  14. 2010 DIETARY GUIDELINES RELEASED; VEGETARIAN AND VEGAN MEAL PATTERNS INCLUDED
  15. About The Vegetarian Resource Group
  16. About VRG-NEWS

1) NEW FORMULATION SKITTLES ARE GELATIN-FREE; STARBURSTS & GUMMIBURSTS CONTAIN NON-KOSHER GELATINS

by Jeanne Yacoubou, MS
VRG Research Director

The VRG recently reported that Skittles(tm) candy contains gelatin. We were told this information in November 2010 by a customer service representative at Wrigley, the company that manufactures Skittles(tm). At that time, we were told that Starburst(tm) and Skittles(tm) candy, both manufactured by Wrigley, contained the same ingredients, including gelatin (in this case, non-Kosher, beef-derived gelatin). It was explained to us that different ingredient proportions and preparation techniques resulted in two distinct candies.

Read the rest of the article on our website:http://www.vrg.org/blog/2010/12/30/new-formulation-skittles-are-gelatin-free-starbursts-gummibursts-contain-non-kosher-gelatins/ ]

For more information on ingredients see [ http://www.vrg.org/ingredients/index.php ]


2) SUMMER STAFF NEEDED FOR VEGETARIAN KITCHEN IN INTERNATIONAL TEEN CAMP

The Global Youth Village [ http://www.globalyouthvillage.org ], a residential, international leadership camp in Virginia's Blue Ridge foothills, is seeking seasonal food service staff in their vegetarian kitchen. Sixty youths and thirty staff enjoy their sugar and meat-free meals family style. Housing, meals and salary are provided. Seeking both experienced cooks and those who want to learn! In addition, GYV welcomes teen applicants for its summer youth programs.

For dates and information on how to apply, please visit Legacy International's web site at [ http://www.globalyouthvillage.org ]. Or contact Leila Baz, Global Youth Village, 1020 Legacy Drive, Bedford, VA 24523; phone (540) 297-5982; email: staff@legacyintl.org


3) VEGETARIAN JOURNAL ISSUE 4 2010 NOW ONLINE!

Features

Have a Panini Party
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_panini.php ]
Nanette Blanchard helps you throw a grilled sandwich soiree!

Do Vegetarians and Vegans Stay Vegetarian? The 2006-2009 VRG Survey
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_retention_survey.php ]

Baby Boomer Cooking
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_baby_boomer.php ]
Debra Daniels-Zeller creates vegan versions of '50s favorites.

Students from Hawaii and Virginia Earn Two VRG $5,000 Scholarships
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_scholarship_winners.php ]

Guatemalan Vegan Cuisine
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_guatemalan.php ]
Sample some Central American recipes with Chef Nancy Berkoff.
¡En español también!
http://www.vrg.org/blog/2011/01/07/cocina-vegana-guatemalteca/ ]

Essay Contest Winners - First Installment
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_essay_winner.php ]

Departments

Nutrition Hotline
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_nutrition_hotline.php ]

Note from the Coordinators
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_coordinators.php ]

Letters to the Editors
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_letters.php ]

Nutrition Now's Calcium Soft Chews Assorted Fruit Variety Are Free of All Animal Products
http://www.vrg.org/blog/2010/03/10/nutrition-nows-calcium-soft-chews/ ]
by Jeanne Yacoubou

Notes from the VRG Scientific Department
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_scientific_dept.php ]

Vegan Cooking Tips
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_vegan_cooking_tips.php ]
Mashed and Stuffed Potatoes, by Chef Nancy Berkoff

Veggie Bits
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_veggie_bits.php ]

Scientific Update
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_scientific_update.php ]

Book Reviews
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_reviews.php ]

Catalog
http://www.vrg.org/catalog ]

Vegetarian Action
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_veg_action.php ]
Go Vegan with Bob Linden, A Commercial Radio Show, by Rachael Prokop

Back Cover
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_back_cover.php ]
Spanish-Language Resources from The VRG


4) TheEthicalMan.com - VEGAN APPAREL BOUTIQUE FOR MEN

TheEthicalMan.com [ http://www.theethicalman.com ] is a new online vegan boutique exclusively for men. Its mission: combine ethics & aesthetics.

TEM exclusively features items that are:

  • CRUELTY-FREE. No animals are harmed or used to make or test the items we feature.
  • MANLY. After all, real men don't hurt animals.
  • ECO-FRIENDLY. Avoiding animal products is the single-best thing any of us can do to reduce our negative ecological impact.

Currently the shop features coats, ties, bow ties, and more, with additional items being added soon. Check out the shop here: [ http://www.theethicalman.com/shop.html ] and TEM's page on Facebook: [ http://www.facebook.com/TheEthicalMan ].


5) WORKING WITH A CATERER

Chapter 20: Working with a Caterer

Excerpted from:

Vegans Know How to Party
http://www.vrg.org/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=63 ]
OVER 465 VEGANS RECIPES, INCLUDING DESSERTS, APPETIZERS, AND MAIN DISHES
By Chef Nancy Berkoff, RD

Purchase a copy for $25.00 here
http://www.vrg.org/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=63 ]
And for a limited time, click here
http://www.vrg.org/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=64 ]
to order 4 books for $50.

Finding a Caterer

Just as it is with any cuisine, caterers have varying abilities to work with vegetarian menus. You may be able to locate a vegetarian caterer in your area or a caterer who offers vegetarian menus along with other cuisines. If you can't get recommendations from friends, you may want to contact vegetarian restaurants or markets that offer prepared vegetarian cuisine. Other catering-locator resources may be the food editor of your local paper or institutions that offer vegetarian cuisine, such as Jain or Seventh-day Adventist groups.

When selecting a caterer, be certain to sample the food they offer. If a vegetarian restaurant or market offers catering services, taste menu items they have prepared before making your selection. If you will be using a caterer, ask for a menu tasting. Be reasonable when you do your tasting. If you are having a small buffet event, with less than 25 people, you should expect only very small samples. If you are having a larger, served event, more than 100 people, you may expect to see and taste an entire plate, so you can get an idea of how the menu items will appear and if the flavors are well matched.

Lots of Catering Concerns

We will leave the finances to you. Needless to say, have a firm idea of your budget before you start "auditioning" caterers. Many caterers charge by the "head," or number of people attending the event. In addition to the menu chosen, prices will differ for served versus buffet meals. Per-head charges may include some or all of the following:

Read the rest of the article on our website:http://www.vrg.org/blog/2011/01/10/working-with-a-caterer/ ]


6) REMINDER: APPLICATIONS FOR VRG'S $5,000 COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP DUE FEB 20

Each year, VRG awards $10,000 in college scholarship money to two high school seniors who have promoted vegetarianism in their schools/communities ($5,000 to each). The deadline - February 20 - is right around the corner, so if you want to apply, or know someone who should apply, click here for more information [ http://www.vrg.org/student/scholar.htm ].

VRG also offers The Eleanor Wolff Scholarship [ http://www.vrg.org/student/eleanor_wolff_scholarship.php ] which is a paid summer internship ($2,500 plus $1,000 toward housing) at VRG's Baltimore office. Here's what our intern Veronica had to say about her internship at VRG last summer: [ http://www.vrg.org/blog/2010/07/21/vrg-summer-internship-report/ ]

Link to our scholarship on the web!

Copy the text below and paste it into your website to use this image to promote our scholarship on the web!

Would you like to sponsor a scholarship or internship? This provides a tremendous opportunity for students who are doing some great work promoting vegetarianism.

Click here [ http://www.vrg.org/student/scholar.htm ] to read about past scholarship winners (right-hand side).

Click here [ http://www.vrg.org/student/eleanor_wolff_scholarship.php#past_interns ] to read about past Eleanor Wolff Scholarship winners.


7) DO VEGETARIANS AND VEGANS STAY VEGETARIAN? VRG 2006-09 SURVEY

Compiled by Ricky Christopher Brathwaite
By Charles Stahler
With assistance of John Cunningham, Kristen Lambert, Rachel Prokop,
and Reed Mangels.

For over fifteen years The Vegetarian Resource Group has been polling the number of vegetarians in the United States. See [ http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/faq.htm#poll ]. We now wanted to look at the number of people who stay vegetarian along with their motivations.

Click here [ http://www.vrg.org/research/retention_survey_2009.php ] to read the entire report.


8) VEGETARIAN JOURNAL'S FOODSERVICE UPDATE PRODUCT LISTING

The Vegetarian Resource Group has produced a list of over 100 companies which offer vegetarian items for schools, restaurants, hospitals, and other institutions. These businesses produce meatless foods in large serving sizes which are easy to use by food services.

This list is a valuable resource for any chef who wants to serve more meatless meals, or any consumer who wants to let their favorite eating spot know about healthy foods they can offer.

Click here for the 2010 update! [ http://www.vrg.org/fsupdate/FSUProducts2010.php ]
Now available in HTML [ http://www.vrg.org/fsupdate/FSUProducts2010.php ]
and PDF [ http://www.vrg.org/fsupdate/FSUProducts.pdf ].


9) BOOK REVIEWS

These book reviews appeared in Issue 4, 2010 of Vegetarian Journal [ http://www.vrg.org/journal ].

The Indian Vegan Kitchen
By Madhu Gadia, MS, RD

Many people from India are vegetarian, but few are vegan. Therefore, I was excited to see this new cookbook, which contains more than 150 vegan Indian recipes.

Among the wide variety of dishes you'll find Mango Soup, Mung Bean Fritters, Madras Potatoes, Creamy Mushroom Curry, Stuffed Okra, Blackened Spicy Chickpeas, Spinach Bengal Gram Dal, Coconut-Vegetable Sambhar, Tamarind Rice Pilaf, Curried Spinach Couscous, Potato-Stuffed Flatbread, Indian Funnel Cakes, Almond Halwa, and much more. Preparation and cooking times, as well as nutritional analyses, are listed with each recipe.

In addition, there are several interesting sections in this book. One defines Indian spices and explains how to make Indian spice blends. Another useful section provides menus for one month. The Indian Vegan Kitchen (ISBN 978-0-399-53530-7) is published by the Penguin Group. It retails for $18.95 and can be purchased online at [ http://astore.amazon.com/httpwwwvrgorg-20/detail/0399535306 ].

Reviewed by Debra Wasserman.

***

Ninety-Five
Edited by No Voice Unheard

Ninety-Five is a beautiful book featuring photos and stories about farm animals who now live on sanctuaries. Readers will find chronicles about cows, birds, pigs, sheep, goats, and other creatures. Each was saved from horrible living conditions and, in some cases, certain death.

Anyone who reads this book and looks at the incredible pictures will be moved to perhaps stop consuming animal products. This work belongs on every coffee table, and you may want to donate a copy to your local library.

Ninety-Five (ISBN978-0-9728387-5-7) is published by No Voice Unheard. This book retails for $19.95 and can be purchased online at [ http://www.novoiceunheard.org ] or in your local bookstore.

Reviewed by Debra Wasserman.


10) MSG, HYDROLYZED PROTEINS, AND AUTOLYZED YEAST EXTRACTS: CLASSIFIED AS FLAVOR ENHANCERS, NOT NATURAL FLAVORS

by Jeanne Yacoubou, MS
VRG Research Director

A reader wrote to us in December 2010 asking us whether "natural flavor" on a label could indicate monosodium glutamate (MSG) may be present. MSG gives a meaty flavor to foods and is common in many fast food and packaged food products. It is of concern to some people who believe it causes MSG Syndrome in which, upon consuming it, they say they suffer a variety of symptoms including headaches, dizziness, and burning sensations in several parts of the body.

Recall the definition of "natural flavor" found in Title 21, Section 101, Part 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations:

"The term natural flavor or natural flavoring means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof, whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional."

According to this definition and other information provided by the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), ginger or black pepper, (examples given by FSIS on one of its FAQ pages), are natural flavors that need to be declared on a label only as "natural flavors" because they "...do not make a nutritional contribution, are not derived from an animal species, and there are no health concerns linked to them." (This statement seems to imply that natural flavors derived from animals need to be so declared, but we know that this is not the case.)

According to FSIS, MSG is not a natural flavor. It is classified as a flavor enhancer by Federal regulation. It appears from the literature about it and from conversations with employees of companies that manufacture it that MSG, as a flavor enhancer, is used "chiefly for flavor" in an ancillary way, and has no nutritional use in foods.

MSG is chemically related to hydrolyzed protein, another common flavor enhancer designated as such by Federal regulation. MSG is the sodium salt of one amino acid, glutamic acid. (Amino acids are components of protein.) During a chemical breakdown of proteins known as hydrolysis, resulting in hydrolyzed proteins, free (i.e., unbound) amino acids are formed. If free glutamate is formed, (as it will in most cases because glutamic acid is common in almost all foods, especially high-protein foods), it will form MSG when it combines with any salt present in food. According to FSIS, in this case, "the presence of MSG does not need to be disclosed on labeling."

FSIS states that "...substances such as dried beef stock, autolyzed yeast, and hydrolyzed proteins must be listed on the label by their common or usual names because their purpose is not just for flavor. They are flavor enhancers, emulsifiers, stabilizers, and binders." It is unclear what function other than one related to flavor MSG, as a flavor enhancer, provides in foods. According to the technical definitions of "emulsifiers, stabilizers, and binders," and in the MSG literature, MSG is not properly identified as an "emulsifier, stabilizer, or binder." Neither is MSG classified as a hydrolyzed protein per se despite the fact that hydrolyzed protein is easily transformed in the presence of salt into MSG. FSIS states only that when MSG itself is added directly to a product, must it be identified as "monosodium glutamate" on the label.

Hydrolyzed proteins may be derived from animal or vegetable sources. In neither case may they be labeled simply as "hydrolyzed protein." The source must be disclosed. For example, a label may read "hydrolyzed whey protein" (a dairy derivative) but never just "hydrolyzed protein." Nor can a hydrolyzed protein, of whatever type, be labeled as "natural flavor" (voluntarily further specified by some companies in some cases as animal- or plant-derived).

Readers may also note that autolyzed yeast and autolyzed yeast extracts, also considered flavor enhancers which impart a meaty (or savory) taste to foods just like MSG does, can form MSG if they combine with any salt present in food. In this case, MSG would not be labeled on a package since it has not been directly added to the food.

To Support, VRG ingredient research, please donate at [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ] or [ http://www.vrg.org/catalog/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=4 ]
To purchase Vegetarian Journal's Guide to Food Ingredients, go to [ http://www.vrg.org/catalog/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=1&sort=20a&alpha_filter_id=71 ]


11) SHELLAC ON COFFEE BEANS?

by Jeanne Yacoubou, MS
VRG Research Director

In response to The VRG's 2010 articles on shellac, a concerned reader wrote in wondering how likely it is that shellac serves as a coating on coffee beans, and, if so, if it would be stated on the label.

When The VRG asked Starbucks Coffee and Whole Foods if shellac were applied as a coating to coffee beans in this country right before being sold or grounded, both companies responded with a definitive "no." Starbucks said: "We do not use shellac on our beans." Whole Foods said: "Nothing is added to our coffee beans. As coffee is roasted the oils inside the beans are brought to the surface. Darker roasted coffees are going to be shinier and have more oils on the surface than a light roasted coffee."

Folger's Coffee also said that nothing is added to their coffee beans. However, when asked if the beans may have been treated soon after harvesting in other countries before they are bagged for shipment to the United States, a Folger's customer service representative said "to the best of my knowledge, no. I'll send the question to our research department for an answer." We don't yet have an answer to this question.

The VRG also spoke to two companies that sell shellac. Both said that shellac may be used as a coating on coffee beans. In fact, one company put it this way when asked if he had ever heard of shellac being used as a coating on coffee beans: "Of course. All the time. It is used to extend the shelf life of the beans." He supplied the contact information for a Canadian company using shellac in this way.

We asked the shellac companies if shellac may more likely be applied to flavored coffee beans than non-flavored ones thinking that possibly the shellac would serve to keep the flavor coating on the beans. It was explained to us that a gum or starch ingredient (most likely vegetable based) would adhere the flavoring to the bean keeping the flavor in place. Shellac, if used at all, would be used as a top layer to make the beans shiny.

According to food laws set forth by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States, coffee beans coated with shellac would have to be labeled as such, just as in the case of fruits or vegetables. "Lac resin" is the most common alternative name among several possibilities. The VRG would hope that a shellac coating be labeled regardless of when the shellac was applied at any point during processing, either here or abroad, as food laws indicate. We are continuing to search for a definitive answer regarding how coffee beans are processed from coffee plant to cup to determine, where, if at all, shellac would most likely be applied.

For more information on shellac, readers may view:

http://www.vrg.org/blog/2010/11/30/q-a-on-shellac/comment-page-1/#comment-19484 ]

http://www.vrg.org/blog/2010/12/13/zein-used-for-shellac-biodegradable-coatings-diapers%E2%80%A6/ ]

To purchase our Guide to Food Ingredients, go to: [ http://www.vrg.org/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=8 ]

To support The Vegetarian Resource Group research, please donate at: [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ]
or
http://www.vrg.org/catalog/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=4 ]


12) WHAT DO HOME SCHOOLERS AND VEGETARIANS HAVE IN COMMON?

by Corey Bivins

When I tell people that I homeschool my children, their response is something like "oh, you must be a saint, I wish I could do that!" If there's one thing I have learned over the years, it's that when you choose to do things that aren't mainstream, be prepared to answer questions regarding misconceptions and assumptions by the misinformed. So, I politely smile and assure them that they could, as I mentally prepare myself to dispel the myths of home schoolers. "Do you really think you're qualified to educate your children?" "Aren't you worried about socialization?" "Don't you get tired of being stuck at home?" Fortunately, I know these questions come from ignorance of homeschooling and I have done my homework and am prepared to enlighten my audience with the facts and truths of homeschooling.

I carry the same attitude about mine and my families food choices. I don't eat meat or dairy and I have chosen to raise my children vegetarian inside our home. But, when folks get wind of our food choices, I am again prepared for the onslaught of the vegetarian myths. "Aren't you worried you're not getting enough protein?" "Do you get sick a lot?" "Don't children need meat in order to grow properly?" Thankfully, to books like Becoming Vegan by Brenda Davis and Vesanto Melina and Simply Vegan by Debra Wasserman and Reed Mangels, I feel I am well versed in meat-free prose to share my knowledge with others in the hopes of easing their fears.

As you can see, home schoolers and vegetarians have several similarities: they are both unconventional, they are both misunderstood, they are both intriguing to those who are unfamiliar with them, and they both have demands for more open-mindedness. I have put together a list of vegetarian related resources for home schooled families to assist in your furthering education of yourselves, your children, and those around you.

www.teachkind.org [ http://www.teachkind.org ], a division of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, is a resource to help students become kinder, more compassionate individuals. There are free lessons, materials, and alternatives to dissection.

www.foodstudies.org [ http://www.foodstudies.org ] offers a Food is Elementary curriculum focusing on plant-based nutrition with lessons plans for pre-k through adult.

www.globalvillageschool.org [ http://www.globalvillageschool.org ] online and text-based curriculum integrating peace, justice, diversity, and sustainability through the "Whole Child, Healthy Planet" curriculum.

www.mistyforesthomeschool.com [ http://www.mistyforesthomeschool.com ] is a home education center in Orlando, Florida for kids K-6. One of the co-directors in a Plant Based Nutrition Educator and past classes included Plant Based Nutrition.

vegbooks.org [ http://vegbooks.org ] is a website dedicated to assisting parents in finding books and movies that support vegetarian and vegan values.

The Vegetarian Resource Journal has several lesson plans and games geared towards veggie kids:

I Love Animals and Broccoli Coloring Book & Activity Book. [ http://www.vrg.org/family/lessonplan.htm ] lesson plans for grades 1 & 2 to accompany the I Love Animals & Broccoli Coloring Book.

http://www.vrg.org/family/memory_cards_math_game1.php ] veggie counting game for kids.

http://www.vrg.org/family/memory_cards.php ] veggie-friendly memory cards for kids.

http://www.vrg.org/environment/K-2_lesson_plan_clean_water.php ] lesson plans for grades K-2 regarding water usage.

http://www.vrg.org/essay/ ] annual essay contest on any aspect of vegetarianism open to everyone under 18 years old.

http://www.vrg.org/student/scholar.htm ] $5000 college scholarship to graduating high school students who have promoted vegetarianism in their community (several home schooled students have entered this).

http://www.vrg.org/teen/ ] FAQs for vegetarian teens and their parents. Topics range from veg-friendly colleges to vegetarian athletes to vegan 4-Hers.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/vrgparents/ ] support group for vegetarian/vegan parents or even parents of kids who want to be vegetarian/vegan. Parents share information on vegetarian/vegan food, restaurants, local events, and even ideas for picky eaters.


13) DONATING TO CHARITY FROM IRA'S

The Pension Protection Act of 2006 added a provision that allowed IRA owners over the age of 70 1/2 to contribute up to $100,000 ($100,000 per spouse for Married Filing Jointly taxpayers) directly to a charity (such as The Vegetarian Resource Group). This direct transfer from the IRA to the charity would count toward the IRA owner's required minimum distribution (RMD) and would be excluded from income on their tax return. The Tax Relief Act extended this provision through 2011.

It should be noted that because the distribution is excluded from income, the taxpayer cannot take a charitable deduction on Schedule A for the amount. Further, in order to qualify, it is required that the distribution be made directly to the organization from the IRA. Distributions made to the taxpayer and then paid by the taxpayer to the charity will not qualify.

(This information is from Clifton Gunderson and should not be construed as legal, accounting, or tax advice. Speak to your own tax professional.)


14) 2010 DIETARY GUIDELINES RELEASED; VEGETARIAN AND VEGAN MEAL PATTERNS INCLUDED

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have released the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This evidence based document assists policy makers, nutrition professionals, food assistance program administrators, the food industry, scientists, academics, and the nutrition-focused media with a consistent, science-based foundation for their nutrition efforts.

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines states: "In prospective studies of adults, compared to non-vegetarian eating patterns, vegetarian style-eating patterns have been associated with improved health outcomes--lower levels of obesity, a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases, and lower total mortality. Several clinical trials have documented that vegetarian eating patterns lower blood pressure."

The Guidelines continue: "On average, vegetarians consume a lower proportion of calories from fat (particularly saturated fatty acids); fewer overall calories; and more fiber, potassium, and vitamin C than do non-vegetarians. Vegetarians generally have a lower body mass index. These characteristics and other lifestyle factors associated with a vegetarian diet may contribute to the positive health outcomes that have been identified among vegetarians."

The Dietary Guidelines include vegetarian and vegan adaptations of USDA food patterns. The vegan dairy group includes calcium-fortified beverages and foods commonly used as substitutes for milk and milk products.

While the USDA Average Daily Food Pattern of the Protein Group at the 2,000 Calorie Level includes 1.8 ounces of meat, 1.5 ounces of poultry, 1.2 oz. of seafood, .4 oz. of egg, no beans and peas, less than .1oz. of soy products, and .5 oz of nuts for a total of 5.5 ounces, THE VEGAN ADAPTATION INCLUDES 1.9 oz. of beans and peas, 1.4 oz. of soy products, and 2.2 oz. of seeds and nuts for a total of 5.5 ounces.

THE U.S.D.A. DAILY VEGAN FOOD PATTERN FOR A 2,000 DAILY INTAKE INCLUDES:

Fruit, 2 cups/day
Dark-green vegetables, 1 1/2 cups/week
Red and orange vegetables, 5 1/2 cups/week
Beans and peas, 1 1/2 cups/week
Starchy Vegetables, 5 cups/week
Other Vegetables, 4 cups/week
Whole grains, 3 oz./day
Refined grains, 3 oz./day
Beans and Peas (in addition to above), 13oz./week
Soy Products, 10 oz./week
Nuts and Seeds, 15oz./week
Dairy (vegan), 3 cups/day
Oils, 18grams/day

The vegan dairy group is composed of calcium-fortified beverages and foods from plant sources. For analysis purposes, the following products were included: calcium-fortified soy beverage, calcium-fortified rice milk, tofu made with calcium-sulfate, and calcium-fortified soy yogurt.

This is not personal nutrition advice. For personal medical and nutrition advice, please speak to your health professional.


ABOUT THE VEGETARIAN RESOURCE GROUP

Our health professionals, activists, and educators work with businesses and individuals to bring about healthful changes in your school, workplace, and community. Registered dietitians and physicians aid in the development of nutrition-related publications and answer member and media questions about vegetarian diets. The Vegetarian Resource Group is a non-profit organization. Financial support comes primarily from memberships, donations, bequests, and book sales. The Vegetarian Journal, a print magazine, is a benefit of membership in The VRG. (For more information, please see the Vegetarian Journal online.)

If you would like to make a donation, become a member, volunteer, or find out more about The VRG, contact us at:

The Vegetarian Resource Group
P.O. Box 1463
Baltimore, MD 21203
Phone: (410) 366-8343
Fax: (410) 366-8804
E-mail: vrg@vrg.org
Website: [ http://www.vrg.org ]
Donate: [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?Action=GC&CID=1561 ]

The contents of this newsletter, and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your own best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.


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Contents of VRG-NEWS are copyright 2011 by The Vegetarian Resource Group. The newsletter may be freely distributed in electronic or print form provided its contents are not altered and credit is given to The Vegetarian Resource Group, P.O. Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203.