The Vegetarian Resource Group Blog

Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurants Have Been Added to The Vegetarian Resource Group’s Online Guide to Veggie Restaurants in the USA and Canada

Posted on January 02, 2018 by The VRG Blog Editor

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The Vegetarian Resource Group maintains an online Guide to Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurants in the USA and Canada. Below are some recent additions. The entire guide can be found here:
VRG Online Veggie Restaurant Guide

To support the updating of this online restaurant guide, please donate at:
Donate to VRG

Café My House
1015 Wellington St. West
Ottawa, ON K1Y 2Y1 Canada
Café My House is an upscale restaurant serving seasonal multi-course tasting menus and brunches. Located just blocks away from the heart of Ottawa’s art district, the restaurant offers a plant-based take on fine dining. Dishes on past tasting menus include risotto-stuffed cabbage, mushroom steaks with miso butter, and jalapeno-mint ice cream. Charcuterie and nut cheese boards are also available. Wine pairings are served alongside the multi-course menus; Café My House sources its natural and biodynamic wines from independent wineries worldwide. The restaurant also has an ever-changing cocktail menu that offers drinks created with house-made bitters, syrups, and liqueurs.

Carina’s Bakery
4725 SW Lombard Ave. #108
Beaverton, OR 97005
Located in a small shopping center across the street from Beaverton Town Square, Carina’s Bakery serves a variety of Swedish baked goods, coffee drinks, and savory lunch items. All items are vegan and soy-free, with gluten-free options available as well. The uniqueness of Carina’s Bakery not only comes from its baked goods, but also from its owner, Carina Comer, who is legally blind. Besides her love of crafting traditional pastries and cookies, she also has a strong commitment to helping people with disabilities learn various skills and share their love of baking. Hiring people who are visually impaired is one way that Carina’s Bakery supports the surrounding community.

Die Pie
11215 Jasper Ave.
Edmonton, AB T5K 0L5 Canada
Die Pie, located in downtown Edmonton, serves vegan pizzas (see photo above) and entrées. Chefs Neil Royale and Karuna Goodall are a brother-and sister-team whose passion for creating plant-based cheeses led them to open their own pizza restaurant. Die Pie offers several different options of vegan cheese including cheddar, harvarti, and gorgonzola. All of the cheeses used on their pizzas are made in-house from ingredients such as cashews and hemp seeds. Fan favorites include the pulled pork pizza, made with jackfruit, and the macaroni and cheese pizza served with cashew mozzarella and king oyster bacon. Gluten-free, nut-free, and soy-free options are available.

Hello 123
1122 Queen St. West
Toronto, ON M6J 1H9 Canada
Hello 123 offers something for everyone with an appetite for healthy, fresh, plant-based eating. Breakfast options include parfaits, avocado toast, waffles and ‘Porridge of the Week’. There are smoothie bowls, cold press juices and coffees and teas. Lunch entrees are offered in either ‘small’ or ‘bigger’ sizes and include salads and noodles with protein options like seasoned chickpeas, seared tempeh and hemp and sunflower balls. The dinner menu consist of many of the lunch entrees in bigger portions.

Urbavore
1103 Church St.
Lynchburg, VA 24504
Homemade, plant-based interpretations of the some of the South’s favorite food dishes is what Urbavore offers to new and seasoned plant-based palettes for both breakfast and lunch. Breakfast or ‘breakie’ choices include biscuits and mushroom gravy, homemade waffles, and pecan scones and maple icing. Homemade mushroom and lentil patties are features under the ‘Burgers’ section of the menu. Lunchtime ‘sammiches’ include ‘Crabbie sliders’ with New Orleans Remoulade and The Barbocoa with cilantro cream sauce, which are both made with Jackfruit. A different soup is featured weekly as a side along with other sides like mac n’ cheese, handmade sweet potato chips, and Caesar and House salads. Sweets are last, but certainly not least, on the menu and include Creme Brulee and Sirabella NY Style Cheesecake.

Vegan Hippie-Chick
1034 Fort St.
Victoria, BC V8V 3K4 Canada
How hip is vegan, plant-based food? Come check out the menu at this groovy cafe that boasts some of the coolest food items in Victoria, BC, Canada where breakfast is served all day. The appetizers are creatively re-named ‘appies’ and include onion rings with nacho cheeze dip, cheezy kale chips, dilly pickle wedges or a cheezy plate. Other menu items include delicious sandwiches like oyster mushroom “pulled pork” in either half or full sizes, raw veggie burgers, and salad bowls like the Far Out Falafel or the Trippy Taco Salad. In addition to the traditional café fair, Vegan Hippie-Chick offers gourmet raw pizza by the slice, made with buckwheat crust. One’s sweet tooth is not neglected either as this cafe also serves five choices of both sweet square trays and birthday cakes.

Vegan Kitchen
794 Neapolitan Way
Naples, FL 34103
Located in the Neapolitan Plaza strip mall, this small restaurant boasts a clean, stylish interior and a tantalizing menu. Options range from traditional Asian fare, such as Pad Thai and dumplings, to an Asian “burrito” (stuffed with rice, mung beans, wheat protein, and avocado, then finished off with a vegan mayo) and a Vegan Shrimp Pasta with your choice of tomato sauce or pesto, topped with mushrooms, cauliflower, and zucchini. Ask about their daily desserts!

Rennet or Lipase in Black Diamond® Cheese?

Posted on January 01, 2018 by The VRG Blog Editor

By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

We received an email inquiry from Tom about the Black Diamond Mature Reserve Cheddar Aged 4 Years Premium Sharp Cheddar Crafted in Canada that he had purchased in Maryland. Tom wrote:

“I’m hoping you can help me find an answer! I have been a vegetarian for 45 years, and finally found a cheddar cheese that I like. It says “enzymes” on the package…I can’t get a straight answer from Diamond in Canada (I called) or the number listed on the package of the American distributor…Their distributor in US told me when I called them that they thought that it probably was microbial… But they weren’t sure, because many of the cheeses that come from Canada are made with rennet. The person in Canada whom I talked with said that I would have to get information from the US distributor only. …Hope you can help. I’ve run up against a brick wall, and I bought 20 pounds of it!”

Note that there are many vegan cheeses now, so the easy and safe option is to purchase those. For example, see:

http://www.vrg.org/blog/2017/05/30/the-vegetarian-resource-groups-guide-to-vegan-cheese/

http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2017issue2/2017_issue2_vegan_cheese.php

http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/Public/VeganCheese2016.pdf

Tom sent us a photo of the cheese label which stated “Black Diamond is a trademark of Parmalat® Canada and distributed by Lactalis® American Group based in Buffalo, NY.”

On the contact request form itself that we sent in, http://www.blackdiamond.ca/contact-us/, this FAQ appears:

“Is there any Rennet in Black Diamond Cheese Products? Most of our Black Diamond natural cheese products are made using microbial enzymes. Some of our products might contain rennet derived from calves when rennet is listed on the ingredient declaration found on the packaging.”

In November-December 2017 The VRG initially called Parmalat, the Canadian company which owns the Black Diamond brand. We were told hat since Black Diamond is not sold in Canada, they had no information on it. He instructed us to call Parmalat’s US distributor, Lactalis American Group.

We called Lactalis and were told that when “enzymes” is listed on the label of Black Diamond cheeses “the enzymes could be animal or microbial; we cannot guarantee one or the other.”

The VRG then asked if the UPC codes on the cheese could be tracked to the American plant where Tom’s cheese was packed and possibly we could know definitively which enzyme was used. It was indicated that the UPC codes could help uncover more information about the cheese making process.

In a second call, we then relayed three UPC codes. She typed them into her computer and said that the codes had not been found in her system. She then repeated what she had declared during our previous call: “The enzyme source in all Black Diamond cheeses could be animal or microbial; we cannot guarantee the source.”

VRG General Advice on Dairy Cheese Enzymes

Some cheeses that have “enzymes” on their label may contain animal rennet or animal lipase.

Only if “microbial” or “vegetarian” appears before “rennet” on the label can you be sure that animal rennet had not been used in the cheese making process.

But even then some consumers may be concerned that the so-called “vegetarian” enzymes originally began many microbial generations ago with animal genetic material that had been engineered into a microbial genome. See: http://www.vrg.org/blog/2012/08/21/microbial-rennets-and-fermentation-produced-chymosin-fpc-how-vegetarian-are-they/

VRG readers may also enjoy many vegan cheese alternatives widely available today. See: https://www.vrg.org/blog/2017/05/30/the-vegetarian-resource-groups-guide-to-vegan-cheese/

[Note: Read labels carefully. “Casein” and ingredients ending in “caseinate” are dairy-derived. Whey is also dairy-derived.]

Lipases may be included in the general word “enzymes” on cheese labels. When in doubt inquire of the manufacturer. See: https://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2008issue3/2008_issue3_update_renet.php for more information.

Incidentally, we asked if lipase was used in the Black Diamond cheddar cheese. Lipase may be used to enhance a cheese’s flavor. She informed us that she had no additional information on lipase itself. “Lipase is an enzyme and as I said before about enzymes, we cannot guarantee its source whether animal or microbial in Black Diamond cheeses.”

The contents of this posting, our website and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

PLEASE DONATE TO THE VEGETARIAN RESOURCE GROUP!

Posted on December 29, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

When making your end-of-year donations, please remember The Vegetarian Resource Group. We greatly appreciate your support. Visit: www.vrg.org/donate

Here are some of the ways your donation will be used throughout the year to come:

$25 Sponsors sending Vegetarian Journal for a year to a Vegetarian/Vegan or Animal Rights Group located overseas in a poor country.

$50 Would go towards reprinting copies of our various vegan brochures/handouts.

$100 The cost to send a box of vegan literature to a student vegetarian/animal rights/ environmental organization for outreach on their campus.

$200 Allows VRG to send Vegetarian Journal for a year to 20 high school students applying to the Vegetarian Resource Group Scholarship.

$300 To print VRG Banners to use at outreach tables throughout the USA.

$500 Will enable us to give runner-up scholarships to high school seniors who promote veganism.

$600 So we can reprint our Spanish coloring book (this would be a matching donation).
See: http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2010issue4/2010_issue4_back_cover.php

Thank you and happy 2018 from The VRG Staff!

GELATIN: Hindus want the Food and Drug Administration to change labeling laws so that labels indicate if gelatin contain beef or pork.

Posted on December 29, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

Hindus want the Food and Drug Administration to change labeling laws so that labels indicate if gelatin contain beef or pork.

For more information, see:
https://www.globalmeatnews.com/Article/2017/12/14/Hindus-have-beef-with-US-gelatin-law?utm_source=newsletter_daily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=14-Dec-2017&c=yazB%2FDHFv2UdsB3XG%2FKgkw%3D%3D&p2=

Lieber’s jel contains: Ingredients: Sugar (non-bone char), adipic acid, carrageenan, potassium citrate, locust bean gum

Order from Vegan Essentials.

https://store.veganessentials.com/liebers-unflavored-jel-p1760.aspx

Also sold in many kosher stores.

We also saw Geff and Glicks brands in a nonkosher supermarket, which caters to the Jewish community.

Note that not all kosher gelatin is vegetarian, so you need to read the label or ask the company.

For more information on gelatin, see:
http://www.vrg.org/ingredients/index.php#gelatin

The contents of this posting, our website and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

Is Pregelatinized Starch Vegan?

Posted on December 28, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

Alternative names: pregelatinized modified starch; pregelatinized food starch; modified starch; instant starch; soluble starch; pregel/prejel starch

Commercial source: plant (corn, tapioca, potato, wheat)
Used in: dry mixes (soups, sauces, etc.), baby food/formula, fruit juice, baked goods, hot cereals, potato products, salad dressings, gravies, pharmaceuticals
Used for: thickening, stabilizing, retaining moisture (in foods); binding, filling or disintegratng (in tablets)

Definition: Prepared from starch or flour, pregelatinized starch easily dissolves in cold liquids eliminating a heating step in manufacturing and becoming viscous like gelatin. It is widely used in foods and pharmaceuticals and also in several other industries including mining/drilling, construction and textiles.

Major Manufacturers:

https://www.tateandlyle.com/ingredient/mira-gel-starch

Tate & Lyle wrote in an email: “I can assure you that no gelatin is used in the production of our prejel starches…Our T&L products are vegan and vegetarian.”

https://www.cargill.com/pharmaceutical/pharma-products/starches

Further information:

http://www.jpharmsci.org/article/S0022-3549(15)00249-X/pdf

https://www.colorcon.com/products-formulation/all-products/excipients/tablets/starch-1500

http://www.grainprocessing.com/industrial-starch-products/pregelatinized-starches.html

http://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/biochemistry-genetics-and-molecular-biology/modified-starch

http://www.vrg.org/blog/2017/12/12/pregelatinized-starch-is-vegan-present-in-many-tylenol-excedrin-motrin-target-pain-relievers/

Classification: Vegan

Entry added: December 2017

For information on other ingredients, see http://www.vrg.org/ingredients/index.php

The contents of this posting, our website, and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

Please Give a Gift Membership including Vegetarian Journal to Family and Friends for $15 in the USA Only Through December 31, 2017!

Posted on December 27, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

2017_issue4_cover

Through December 31, 2017, you can give a gift membership to The Vegetarian Resource Group (includes a 1-year subscription to Vegetarian Journal) for $15 each (40% discount). This offer is valid in the USA only!

This is a terrific way to share the vegan message, as well as support VRG. Gift subscriptions can be done online by simply typing in your message and the address(s) of the gift recipient(s) in the comments field. Go to: https://www.givedirect.org/donate/?cid=1565

VRG Offers One $10,000 Scholarship plus Two $5,000 Scholarships to Graduating High School Seniors in the USA – Deadline is February 20th!

Posted on December 27, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

promo_scholarships

Due to the generosity of an anonymous donor, The Vegetarian Resource Group each year will award $20,000 in college scholarship money to graduating U.S. high school students who have promoted veganism/vegetarianism in their schools and/or communities. Vegetarians do not eat meat, fish, or fowl. Vegans are vegetarians who do not use other animal products such as dairy or eggs.

One award of $10,000 and two awards of $5,000 will be given. Entries may only be sent by students graduating from high school in spring 2018. Deadline is February 20, 2018. We will accept applications postmarked on or before February 20, 2018. Early submission is encouraged!

Applicants will be judged on having shown compassion, courage, and a strong commitment to promoting a peaceful world through a vegan/vegetarian diet/lifestyle. Payment will be made to the student’s college (U.S. based only). Winners of the scholarships give permission to release their names to the media. Applications and essays become property of The Vegetarian Resource Group. We may ask finalists for more information. Scholarship winners are contacted by e-mail or telephone. Please look at your e-mail.

For details on the contest, see: VRG Scholarship Contest

CAVA® Grill Vegan Options

Posted on December 26, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

Cava Toppings

By Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

In 2006, three Greek childhood friends opened full-service Cava Mezze http://www.cavamezze.com/ in their Rockville, MD hometown followed by other locations in Washington, DC, Maryland, and Virginia. The restaurants featured small plate (mezze) Greek dining.

As a spin-off on Cava Mezze, the founders launched in 2011 Cava Grill http://cava.com/, a fast-casual, Greek- and Mediterranean-inspired restaurant chain with locations in the Delaware/Maryland/Virginia region. Since then DC-based Cava has expanded to the New York City area and California with plans to open locations in North Carolina, Texas, and Massachusetts by 2018. As of December 2017, there are approximately forty Cava Grill locations in the United States according to their website: http://cava.com/locations

Since late 2008, Cava’s dips & spreads are sold at specialty markets nationwide: http://cava.com/products/where-to-buy

The VRG corresponded by email with Megan Vlasho, Customer Experience Manager, and Zach Korte, Food Safety Quality Engineer at Cava Grill, to find out more about its vegan menu items. Here is what we learned between July to November 2017. Our questions are arranged by Cava’s menu item categories as they appear on the chain’s website.

Base:
The VRG: Does your pita or mini-pita contain milk, whey, or any dairy ingredient?
Cava: No, none of our pitas contain dairy.

The VRG: Does your pita or mini-pita contain sugar?
Cava: They contain sugar.

The VRG: Do you use organic sugar in your pita breads making them from scratch? If you use a premix or premade dough, do you know if the sugar in the pita is non-cow bone char processed?
Cava: We get our pita bread from a third party, so I’ll have to ask them about their sugar.

Zach wrote: I’ve been in contact with our pita supplier. They state that they are 100% vegetarian, and they are halal-certified, which ensures no animal products are present in the final product. Their suppliers, including sugar, are confidential, so they could not share the information about bone char processing.

The VRG: Is L-cysteine used as a dough conditioner in your pita or mini-pita?
Cava: Our supplier … (said) In the past it was made from sugar beets; however this has recently changed and they are now using the ingredient which is made from feathers.

The VRG: Do you use meat stock or broths to cook the rice?
Cava: Vegetable broth.

Dips + Spreads:
The VRG: Do you make your hummus starting from dry garbanzo beans?
Cava: We use canned chickpeas in our hummus.

The VRG: Is the hummus all-vegetable?
Cava: We have a number of hummus options.
[VRG Note: Complete hummus ingredient information is presented by clicking on entries shown here: http://cava.com/products.]

The VRG: Does the roasted red pepper hummus contain cheese?
Cava: No.

The VRG: Does the harissa sauce contain mayonnaise or any dairy?
Cava: No.
[VRG Note: Cava’s other menu offerings in this category: Tzatziki Sauce, Eggplant & Red Pepper Dip, and Crazy Feta contain dairy.]

The VRG: Is your feta cheese made with animal rennet?
Cava: I spoke with our feta supplier and they use vegetarian microbial rennet.

The VRG: Does your feta cheese contain animal lipase?
Cava: [It contains] an animal-based lipase.

The VRG: Does your feta cheese contain any other animal-derived enzymes?
Cava: [The lipase is] the only animal-derived enzyme in the product.

The VRG: Does the yogurt in your Tzatziki Sauce and the Eggplant & Red Pepper Dip contain any animal-derived enzymes or cultures?
Cava: The yogurt in our dips & spreads is manufactured using non-animal enzymes and cultures.

Protein:
The VRG: Is the falafel all-vegetable? Is it prepared away from all meats?
Cava: Our beef meatballs, lamb meatballs, and falafel are prepared using the same prep equipment (bowls) but they are thoroughly washed and sanitized between their use with different recipes.

The VRG: Is the falafel fried in fresh oil? If so, which type of oil?
Cava: The falafel is fried in canola oil, which is changed on a regular basis and only used to fry our falafel, pita chips, and pita crisps toppings.

The VRG: Are the pita chips made from the pita bread?
Cava: Yes.

The VRG: Are the roasted vegetables prepared in animal fats or in contact with meats during storage and/or preparation?
Cava: No.

Toppings:
The VRG: Are the pickled onions and/or pickled banana peppers made with vinaigrette?
Cava: No, but our pickled onions do contain sugar.

The VRG: Does the cabbage slaw contain vinaigrette?
Cava: No. It uses olive oil and lemon juice.

The VRG: Are the tomato + cucumber and the tomato + onion salads all-vegetable?
Cava: Yes.

The VRG: Is the Cauliflower Quinoa Tabbouleh all-vegetable?
Cava: Yes, with the addition of olive oil, herbs, and seasoning.

The VRG: Is the White Bean Salad all-vegetable?
Cava: Yes, with the addition of olive oil, herbs, and seasoning.

Dressings:
The VRG: Are the following dressings all-vegetable?
•Apricot Dill
•Greek Vinaigrette
•Lemon Herb Tahini
•Green Harissa
Cava: Yes.

The VRG: Do they contain added sugar?
Cava: Yes to all but our Summer Spicy Apricot contains agave.

Later we asked for a sugar update:
The VRG: Has Cava begun using 100% USDA Organic sugar that is never filtered through cow bone char?
Cava: We switched to organic sugar, which does not use bone char, about a month ago.
[VRG Note: We received this reply on October 10, 2017.]

The VRG: Looking again at your allergen page and menu, I noticed “mezze” on the allergen page (in the “base + extras” table) but did not see it on your menu. What specifically is “mezze” and how is it vegetarian?
Cava: “Mezze” on our menu refers to your choice of three dips + pita chips, which are all vegetarian. Ingredient specifications for each of our dips can be found on our Allergens page.

Cava offers some seasonal menu items. Viewing its Fall 2017 menu, The VRG asked the following about fall menu offerings.

The VRG: Are the following all-vegetable?
•Greek Minestrone Soup with Harissa
•Juices: Apple Cinnamon Sage, Cucumber Mint, Blackberry Orange Shrub, Rosemary Limeade
•Seasonal Roasted Vegetables
•Carrots & Currants topping
•Yellow Pepper Tahini dressing
Cava: Yes, all those menu items contain only vegetables/vegetarian ingredients.

The VRG: Do the fall menu items listed in the previous question contain sugar?
Cava: The rosemary limeade contains organic cane sugar. The shrub and cucumber mint juices contain agave.

The VRG: Do any of your menu items contain honey?
Cava: None of our menu items contain honey.

Interested readers may find out more about Cava Grill:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/meggentaylor/2016/07/13/is-cava-grill-the-next-shake-shack-for-fast-casual-mediterranean-inspired-cuisine/#5081a21366de

The contents of this posting, our website and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

Are You Looking for Some Last Minute Vegan Recipes for Christmas or New Year’s Day? Here’s Some Ideas.

Posted on December 25, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

Christmas
Perhaps some unexpected guests might show up at your house on Christmas or New Year’s Day and you would like to have some pre-made food to offer them. Below are two articles we previously ran in Vegetarian Journal featuring holiday recipes.

Holiday Recipes
Peggy Rynk offers these recipes:
Hot Spiced Apple Juice with Cinnamon and Cloves
Chilled Marinated Vegetables
Cayenne Pecans
Green Pea Spread
Bean and Tomato Spread
Vegan “Cream Cheese” Spread
Pumpkin-Cranberry Cookies
Whole wheat and Carob Brownies
Chocolate Chip Bars
Dried Fruit Compote with Lemons

Finger Foods
Zel Allen provides these finger-food recipes:
Overstuffed Spuds
Almond and Olive-Stuffed Brussels Sprouts
Red Light Stuffed Mushrooms
Spanish Tapenade Stuffed Tomatoes
Teriyaki Tempeh Bites
Pickled Vegetables
Smoky Garlic-Stuffed Endive
Chili Nuts
Tahini Peanut Confections
Choco Caramel Confections

To subscribe to Vegetarian Journal, visit:
Subscribe to Vegetarian Journal

Restaurants Offering New Year’s Eve/Day Vegan Meals

Posted on December 22, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

new-year-clipart-star-3

Here’s a list of some restaurants offering vegan meals New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day! Happy 2018 from The Vegetarian Resource Group.

Avant Garden, New York City, NY http://www.avantgardennyc.com/
Chef Tanya’s Kitchen, Palm Springs, CA https://www.cheftanyapetrovna.com/events/2017/12/12/new-years-day-special-event
Cienfuegos, New York, NY http://www.cienfuegosny.com/
Ethos Vegan Kitchen, Winter Park, FL http://www.ethosvegankitchen.com/news.html#news-events
Fare Well, Washington, DC http://www.eatfarewell.com/
Golden Mean Café, Santa Monica, CA http://www.goldenmeancafe.com/
Herban Fix, Atlanta, GA http://herbanfix.com/events
Ladybird, New York, NY http://www.ladybirdny.com/
Sanctuary Bistro, Berkeley, CA http://www.sanctuarybistro.com
Sunflower, Sandy Springs, GA http://www.cafesunflower.com/events/
The Block off Biltmore, Asheville, NC http://theblockoffbiltmore.com/index.php/events/events/
Urban Vegan Kitchen, New York City, NY http://www.urbanvegankitchen.com/V Eats, Dallas, TX http://www.v-eats.com/

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