The Vegetarian Resource Group Blog

Update from Lauren Hickey – Vegetarian Resource Group 2016 Scholarship Winner

Posted on January 04, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

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Before classes even started, I was known as “the vegetarian.” Ten other Bowdoin freshmen and I were on a four-day pre-orientation trip to a Native American reservation. We stopped at Aldi’s to shop for our meals for the week. Apparently I established myself as the resident veggie-expert. My trip-mates followed me around as I wheeled my cart through the produce section searching for salad ingredients and vegetarian pizza toppings. They genuinely inquired about my vegetarianism: “Do you miss meat? How do you get protein? Should I eat kale? Why are you a vegetarian?” Even though one boy immediately established himself as the avid “meat-lover” and another girl pronounced, “I’ve never eaten salad,” I engaged them in conversation with a smile—showing them how to eat a cheap, healthy, and simple vegetarian diet.

Our meals were the highlight of the entire trip. We had a blast in the kitchen: baking, boiling, chopping, tossing, and sautéing. I couldn’t tell them not to put pepperoni on the other pizza or make tacos without meat—I just showed them the yummy and easy possibilities for vegetarian alternatives.

The other day, I grabbed a meal in the dining hall with the “meat-loving” boy from that trip. He sat down across from me with a salad. On that trip, I also learned about the harsh realities of diet on Native American reservations. There are increasing rates of obesity and diabetes, and I had to look no farther than the bologna sandwiches and sipping soda served to the kids at the Rec Center. But there was hope, and to my delight, it came in the form of vegetables!

Newel Lewey helped established raised garden beds at over 100 homes on the reservation. He brought us to the greenhouse he built at the language-immersion school where elementary students come to learn the Passamaquoddy language and garden-literacy at the same time! I couldn’t believe it—someone who shared my passion, yet in a completely different place! I spent 30 minutes talking to Newell about the challenges and rewards associated with transforming the way a community sees food. He opened my eyes to food justice—the idea that everyone, no matter their race or socioeconomic status, should have equal access to healthy, wholesome food. I wrote down his email so that I can ask him to speak at Bowdoin!

My favorite club at Bowdoin is the Bowdoin Organic Garden (BOG) club. In the summer/fall I harvested and delivered garden produce directly to both dining halls on campus (the dining halls label BOG ingredients). This promotes in-season, organic, plant-based meals.

My favorite event I participated in through this club was serving garden-fresh hand-milled corn tortillas, salsa, peppers, and kohlrabi to the campus community! I loved this event because I got to teach people about foreign-sounding vegetables like kohlrabi and talk about why it’s so rewarding to eat a home-grown, plant-based diet! I also gleaned with the BOG, which is when volunteers go to a local farm and harvest all excess produce from the fields that would otherwise go to waste because of appearance or quality. Then we deliver that produce to a soup kitchen in Brunswick, which I also volunteer at.

I always strive to be better. That’s why I am trying veganism! It’s great to have a support network of other people (i.e. people from BOG) who are also food-conscious—we keep each other honest and share ideas! My college makes it super easy—they label everything and always have a vegan and vegetarian main course and even vegan dessert! However, I recognize that although my college does a lot to accommodate special diets, they should make plant-based meals a priority.

Last month, Katie Scott from the New England chapter of the Humane Society visited me at Bowdoin. Katie’s job is to implement Meatless Monday programs in cafeterias and dining halls all over New England. I met with her to talk about implementing a program at Bowdoin. I heard from upperclassmen that Bowdoin attempted Meatless Mondays a few years back, but it only lasted until the football team protested the campaign. Obviously, there might be a few challenges to renewing this program but Katie and I are hopeful and committed. My next steps include meeting the head chefs and ask what exactly happened when they tried Meatless Mondays. Then I want to propose the idea to the Organic Garden and see if we can network with eco-reps and other food-oriented clubs on campus to put out surveys to the campus community about Meatless Mondays.

I am infinitely grateful for this scholarship! I couldn’t be happier at Bowdoin! Thank you for making it possible!

For information about applying to the 2017 Vegetarian Resource Group college scholarships (deadline is February 20, 2017), see: http://www.vrg.org/student/scholar.htm

To donate towards VRG scholarships, internships, and other outreach to young people and foodservices, donate at http://www.vrg.org/donate

Join VRG at http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Here is more information about Lauren.
http://www.vrg.org/blog/2016/06/23/connecticut-student-wins-10000-vegetarian-resource-group-scholarship/

Being Vegan in a Foodservice Class

Posted on January 03, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

By Casey Brown, former VRG Intern

As a Dietetics Student at the University of Maryland, College Park, we
are required to take Foodservice Operations. One of our projects for
this class was to work in groups of three and design a theme meal to
serve 55 people. This meal had to meet certain requirements for
nutritional standards and budgeting.

As a vegan, I was hoping that our meal could be 100% plant-based. I
met with my friends who were my group members (both of them were
non-vegetarians), and they were both eager to design a vegan menu. We
all knew it would be a unique meal plan. It would likely be lower cost
since we did not have to purchase meats, it would be lower in fat, and
it would show everyone that vegan food can be nutritious and delicious!

After forming our groups, the first step was to design our menu. We had
to pick a theme for our meal and then decide on our recipes. Our menu
had to consist of a bread, an appetizer, an entree, a starch, a
vegetable, and a dessert. As a group, we made a huge list of potential
vegan recipes that we could use and then used those options to select
our theme. We originally planned to do a Southwestern Vegan menu, but
ultimately decided to do a Plant-based Picnic theme. Our professor was
hesitant about our menu since meat is the main component of the meal in
her culture. She was skeptical about us serving tofu, but she let us
continue on as we planned. Our menu underwent many changes as we
continuously planned the meal and tried new recipes. The final menu
consisted of herb drop biscuits, an autumn fruit salad, tofu strips with
ketchup, grilled zucchini, a couscous salad, and key lime pies. While
planning the menu seemed like hard work, there was a lot left to do. We
had to quantify all of the recipes to serve 55 people, determine the
nutritional content of each item, determine the overall cost of the
meal, schedule each of the student employees for the day, and more. It
was time consuming but rewarding work, which paid off in the end.

On the day of the theme meal, we decorated the room with picnic
tablecloths, mason jars with flowers and greenery, and upbeat music.
While the dining room appeared peaceful, the kitchen was fairly hectic.
We had eight people to cook enough food for 55 people in three and a
half hours, and it was our first day in the kitchen. Even though all of
the dishes piled up, the seven of the recipes were prepared and ready to
serve by lunch time. We had about 30 reservations for our meal and
additional to-go orders. In total we served about 45 people, including
our professor, who was very impressed with the meal. We received decent
reviews on almost every item, although not everyone seemed to like the
couscous salad (this was most likely due to a lack of seasoning). We
received comments that the meal was “so yummy,” “perfectly cooked,” and
a “delicious, filling, and healthy meal.”

It was such an exciting event being able to prepare and serve vegan
recipes to such a large crowd! These individuals often come to our theme
meals, which are usually not vegan. It was a great opportunity to expose
people to these recipes and show them that vegan meals taste great and
are healthy!

To see the recipes we prepared, visit:
http://www.vrg.org/fsupdate/CaseyQuantityThemeMealRecipes.pdf

For foodservice information, see: http://www.vrg.org/fsupdate/index.htm

For information about VRG internships, see:
http://www.vrg.org/student/index.php

FDA URGED TO DECIDE WHAT CAN BE CALLED MILK

Posted on January 02, 2017 by The VRG Blog Editor

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Thirty-two congressmen from dairy-producing states are urging the Food
and Drug Administration to only allow milk from a cow to be called milk.
(Does that mean goat’s milk or breast milk couldn’t be called milk?)

See:
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/milk-substitutes-soy-almond-substitutes-plant-based-alternatives-label-fight/

Last Chance to Support The Vegetarian Resource Group in 2016!

Posted on December 30, 2016 by The VRG Blog Editor

Your donations make a huge difference! Please consider donating $25, $50, or $100 to The Vegetarian Resource Group so we can continue promoting the veggie message for years to come. Better yet, become a Life Member for $500! Your support and kind words are greatly appreciated. Happy 2017!

To donate, visit: www.vrg.org/donate

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Vegan Options at Red Robin® Gourmet Burgers and Brews

Posted on December 30, 2016 by The VRG Blog Editor

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by Jeanne Yacoubou, MS

After selecting “Nutrition & Allergens” from the Browse Other Topics list which appears after clicking on “Guest Support” in the upper right corner of Red Robin’s homepage http://www.redrobin.com, readers find this Q&A:

Q: Do you currently have vegan and/or vegetarian offerings on your menu?

A: Absolutely. At most Red Robin restaurants, our vegan and vegetarian guests can savor a BOCA® Original vegan burger (excluding our Canada locations) or a Gardenburger® patty at no additional cost. We’re also salad-lovers, which means you’ll likely find our mix of salads and other entrées quite gratifying. Got something specific in mind? Just tell one of our team members, and we’ll gladly handcraft something to meet your dietary needs.

The VRG asked Nicole Jones, Quality & Nutrition Manager at Red Robin Gourmet Burgers and Brews, about their vegan menu items. Following is our Q&A with Nicole.

Q: Could you send us a list of the ingredients for the BOCA® and Gardenburger®? [VRG Note: VRG bolded non-vegan or possibly non-vegan ingredients. Contact Red Robin for more information.]

A: Garden Burger: Cooked brown rice (brown rice, water), vegetables (mushrooms, onions), water, rolled oats, mozzarella cheese (pasteurized part-skim milk, cultures, salt, annatto for color, enzymes), bulgur wheat with water for hydration, cheddar cheese (pasteurized milk, salt, enzymes, cultures, annatto for color), soy protein concentrate. Contains 2% or less of: parsley, yeast extract, salt, modified vegetable gum, wheat gluten, garlic powder, autolyzed yeast extract, spices, citric acid, malted barley flour, natural butter flavor, annatto for color, whey, guar gum, natural smoke flavor, turmeric for color, soy lecithin.

BOCA: Water, Soy Protein Concentrate, Wheat Gluten, Contains Less Than 2% of Methylcellulose, Salt, Caramel Color Dried Onions, Yeast Extract, Sesame Oil, Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein, Natural and Artificial Flavor (Non-Meat), Disodium Guanylate, Disodium Inosinate.

Q: Are the BOCA and Gardenburger prepared away from all meat products?

A: The BOCA is cooked separately but the Garden Patty can be finished on our flattop grill (which may cook other proteins depending on the restaurant or in a frying pan – the guest can always ask to have it cooked in a clean frying pan at time of order if there are concerns).

Q: Could you send a list of ingredients for the bun(s) that you consider to be all-vegetable and which are served with the Boca and Gardenburger?

A: Our buns do meet the vegetarian criteria but most do not for vegan other than the ciabatta bun or lettuce wrap. [VRG Note: VRG bolded non-vegan or possibly non-vegan ingredients. Contact Red Robin for more information.]

Bun, Ciabatta: Bleached enriched flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, reduced iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folate), water, wheat gluten, high fructose corn syrup, yeast, fully refined soybean oil, salt, calcium propionate (to retard spoilage),dough improver: (malted wheat flour, enzymes, contains 2% or less of ascorbic acid), calcium sulfate, enzymes.

Bun, Corn Jalapeno: UNBLEACHED ENRICHED FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, MALTED BARLEY FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WATER, DEGERMINATED YELLOW CORNMEAL, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMIN MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID, YEAST, WHEAT GLUTEN, HONEY, GRANULATED SUGAR, FULLY REFINED SOYBEAN OIL, JALAPENO FLAKES, SALT, CALCIUM PROPIONATE (TO RETAIN FRESHNESS), DOUGH IMPROVER (MALTED WHEAT FLOUR, ENZYMES AND 2% OR LESS OF ASCORBIC ACID), CALCIUM SULFATE, ENZYMES

Bun, Gluten Free: WATER, GLUTEN-FREE BLEND (CORN STARCH, POTATO STARCH, MODIFIED TAPIOCA STARCH, CORN FLOUR, TAPIOCA STARCH, GARBANZO BEAN FLOUR, MILLET FLOUR, SORGHUM FLOUR, AMARANTH FLOUR, BROWN RICE FLOUR, WHITE RICE FLOUR), CELLULOSE POWDER, SUGAR, DRIED EGG WHITE, PSYLLIUM, SALT, MODIFIED CELLULOSE GUM, CELLULOSE GUM, CALCIUM PROPIONATE, SODIUM PROPRIONATE, NIACIN (VITAMIN B3), REDUCED IRON, THIAMINE, MONONITRATE (VITAMIN B1), RIBOFLAVIN (VITAMIN B2), FOLIC ACID, YEAST, CANOLA OIL, TAPIOCA FLOUR, RICE FLOUR, EGG WHITE SOLIDS, XANTHAN GUM, SODIUM ALGINATE, GUAR GUM, TAPIOCA STARCH.

Bun, Onion Chive, Kaiser: UNBLEACHED ENRICHED FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, MALTED BARLEY FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WATER, ONION, FULLY REFINED SOYBEAN OIL, POTATO FLOUR, YEAST, WHEAT GLUTEN, GRANULATED SUGAR, SALT, DRIED CHIVES, CALCIUM PROPIONATE (TO RETAIN FRESHNESS), DOUGH IMPROVER (MALTED WHEAT FLOUR, ENZYMES AND 2% OR LESS OF ASCORBIC ACID), ONION POWDER, CALCIUM SULFATE, ENZYMES

Bun, Telera: Unbleached Flour (Wheat, Malted Barley), Water, Durum Flour, Sugar, Palm Oil, Wheat Gluten, Salt, Contains less than 2% of each of the following: Yeast, Soybean Oil, Dextrose, Corn Starch, Monoglycerides, Enzymes, Enriched with (Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid) and Calcium Propionate (preservative).

Bun, Whole Grain, 4.5 Inch: ENRICHED FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, MALTED BARLEY FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WATER, SUGAR, WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, YEAST, WHEAT GLUTEN, SOYBEAN OIL, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF SALT, EMUSIFIER (MONOGLYCERIDE WITH ANTIOXIDANTS), SODIUM STEAROYL LACTYLATE, CARAMEL COLOR, CALCIUM PROPIONATE (PRESERVATIVE). MAY CONTAIN THE FOLLOWING DOUGH CONDITIONERS: MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE, SALT, CORN STARCH, AMMONIUM SULFATE, ASCORBIC ACID, CALCIUM SULFATE, CALCIUM PEROXIDE, ENZYMES. TOPPING: CRACKED WHEAT.

Bun, Yellow Seeded: ENRICHED FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, MALTED BARLEY FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WATER, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, YEAST, SOYBEAN OIL, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF SALT, WHEAT GLUTEN, CALCIUM PROPIONATE (PRESERVATIVE), EMUSIFIER (MONOGLYCERIDE WITH ANTIOXIDANTS), NATURAL COLOR (YELLOW CORN FLOUR, SOYBEAN OIL, TURMERIC AND PAPRIKA OLEORESINS, MONO/DIGLYCERIDES, NATURAL FLAVOR), SODIUM STEAROYL LACTYLATE. DOUGH CONDITIONER MAY CONTAIN: MONOCALCIUM PHOSPHATE, SODIUM CHLORIDE, CORN STARCH, AMMONIUM SULFATE, ASCORBIC ACID, CALCIUM SULFATE, CALCIUM PEROXIDE, ENZYMES. TOPPING: WATER, SESAME SEEDS.

Q: Are your Mushroom and Zucchini Jump Starters free of all animal ingredients including eggs and dairy?

A:[They] are fried in our common fryers so there is potential of cross contact of animal proteins.

Q: Is the broccoli side dish free of all animal ingredients including eggs and dairy?

A: Yes

Q: Hummus Plate: May guests order this item without croutons? Is it served with pita bread or something similar? If so, is the bread product all-vegetable?

A: [Hummus] is no longer a menu offering. [VRG Note: As of December 2016, hummus (“Heck-Yeah Hummus Plate”) was listed on Red Robin’s website as an appetizer when using the Nutrition Customizer tool.]

Q: Is the Creamy Artichoke & Spinach Dip free of all animal ingredients including eggs and dairy?

A: No, the dip contains cheese.

Q: Are the Guacamole and Salsa with Chips made without any animal ingredients such as gelatin?

A: No, they are not made with gelatin or animal byproducts.

Q: Are the Southwest Black Beans prepared with animal broths or fats? Do they contain animal-based natural flavors?

A: No, they are black beans with seasoning and our salsa added…no animal fats or byproducts added.

Q: Which, if any, of your fries or rings are free of all animal ingredients including eggs and dairy? Are they prepared in oil used to cook dairy-containing menu items (such as cheese sticks), meat or seafood?

A: [T]hey are cooked in a designated fryer which only cooks our steak fries, Yukon Chips, sweet potato fries, potato hashbrowns, and the corn tortilla chips. However, on our allergen menu due to cross contact of allergens in the fryer area with splashback, vapors from one fryer to another we cannot guarantee no cross contact of allergens so we claim all ingredients cooked in any fryer as containing shellfish, fish, wheat, eggs, milk and soy.

Q: When we used the Allergen Customizer tool through your Interactive Allergen Menu page selecting eggs, milk, fish and shellfish, the only appetizer that appeared (as “suitable with modification”) was the Guacamole, Salsa and Chips plate: http://www.redrobin.com/allergen-customizer.html#sides “No white corn tortilla chips” appeared as the modification needed to make this appetizer acceptable to someone avoiding eggs, milk, fish and shellfish. Tortilla strips were identified as an “acceptable option.” A statement on that page read “corn tortilla chips are prepared in a dedicated fryer.” If so, why were white corn tortilla chips excluded as unacceptable?

A: See response above.

Red Robin also offers a Nutrition Customizer tool on its website so patrons may determine total calorie counts and other nutritional information about any menu item or group of menu selections.

Red Robin also offers a Nutrition Customizer tool on its website so patrons may determine total calorie counts and other nutritional information about any menu item or group of menu selections.

http://www.redrobin.com/nutrition-customizer.html#appetizers

Red Robin guests who would like to order a BOCA burger will find it listed as one of the Keep It Simple burgers found on the Gourmet Burgers page of the main menu: http://www.redrobin.com/menu/full-menu-rrgb-t4/gourmet-burgers/keep-it-simple.html

A mention of the vegan burger option also appears on the Garden Burger page of Red Robin’s website: http://www.redrobin.com/menu/full-menu-rrgb-t4/gourmet-burgers/garden-burger.html

The vegan BOCA appears as one type of Red’s Burgers on the Kid’s Menu: http://www.redrobin.com/menu/full-menu-rrgb-t4/kids-menu/kids-burger.html

Complete ingredient statements for menu items are not located on Red Robin’s website. Diners with questions should contact this restaurant chain or ask a manager for more information.

The contents of this posting, our website and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

For information about other chains, see http://www.vrg.org/fastfoodinfo.php

For information on vegetarian and vegan restaurants, see http://www.vrg.org/restaurant/index.php

To support The Vegetarian Resource Group researcher, see https://www.givedirect.org/donate/?cid=1565

To join The Vegetarian Resource Group, go to http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

Vegan Tinted Lip Balm in Several Flavors Now Available!

Posted on December 29, 2016 by The VRG Blog Editor

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Surya Brasil now offers vegan tinted lip balm in 6 flavors: Blood Orange, Coconut Nectar, Pink Grapefruit, Pomegranate, Sugared Fig, and Vanilla Dragon Fruit. The lip balms are organic and cruelty-free.

To order the product online, visit:
http://www.suryabrasilproducts.com/collections/vegan-lip-balms

VEGETARIAN SOCIETY OF DC LIFE AFFIRMING THANKSGIVING

Posted on December 29, 2016 by The VRG Blog Editor

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By Casey Brown, former VRG Intern

This Thanksgiving I had the opportunity to staff The Vegetarian Resource Group booth at the Life-Affirming Thanksgiving event in Bethesda, Maryland. This is an annual event that is sponsored by The Vegetarian Society of DC. Vegetarians and non-vegetarians come together to celebrate a compassionate and delicious vegan Thanksgiving meal. The meal consisted of soup, salad, appetizers, a main course, sides, and a dessert. Some of the options included curried pumpkin soup, sweet and sour meatballs, quinoa stuffed acorn squash, and mini pumpkin pies. The event also had multiple exhibitors, a silent auction, and guest speaker Neal Barnard from the PCRM.

At this event, we had the opportunity to interact with many different people! It was really exciting because so many of them were familiar with The VRG. Many people had copies of our Vegetarian Journal at home, however we were able to hand out many more! The VRG Journal includes many recipes, product and book reviews, health updates, and other information. Many people were also interested in our “My Vegan Plate” handouts, which provide information on how to make a balanced vegan meal. As usual, our coloring books were very popular among the kids who were especially excited to have a coloring book full of animals. Also, many people were interested in our “Veganism in a Nutshell” and “Vegetarianism in a Nutshell” brochures and handouts since they provide information on making the transition to these lifestyles and nutrition information about these diets.

I am so grateful to have spent my Thanksgiving celebrating in such a positive atmosphere. I have never before spent Thanksgiving in a room full of so many other vegetarians and vegans, but it is definitely something I will always cherish and be thankful for. If you would like more information on this event or The Vegetarian Society of DC please visit http://www.vsdc.org/.

To volunteer at future VRG booths, contact Brigette at vrg@vrg.org

To support Vegetarian Resource Group outreach, donate at https://www.givedirect.org/donate/?cid=1565

Or join at http://www.vrg.org/member/2013sv.php

New Year’s Eve (or Day) Vegan Meals at Restaurants

Posted on December 28, 2016 by The VRG Blog Editor

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Here’s a list of some restaurants offering vegan meals New Year’s Eve or New Year’s Day! Happy 2017 from The Vegetarian Resource Group.

Avant Garden, New York City, NY http://www.avantgardennyc.com/
Café Flora, Seattle, WA https://www.facebook.com/pages/Cafe-Flora/112894108732
Café Sunflower, Atlanta, GA http://www.cafesunflower.com/events/
Cleveland Vegan, Lakewood, OH http://clevelandvegan.com/
Fare Well, Washington, DC http://www.eatfarewell.com/
Hangawi, New York City, NY http://www.hangawirestaurant.com/Holiday%20Menu%202016.pdf
Harvest at the Bindery, Portland, OR http://harvestatthebindery.com/index.html
Ladybird, New York City, NY http://www.ladybirdny.com/holiday
Mother of Pearl, New York Ctiy, NY http://www.motherofpearlnyc.com/
Plant, Asheville, NC (dinner New Year’s Day) http://plantisfood.com/
Planta, Toronto, ON Canada http://www.plantatoronto.com/
Sprig & Vine, New Hope, PA http://www.sprigandvine.com/
Sanctuary Bistro, Berkeley, CA http://www.sanctuarybistro.com
Sticky Fingers, Washington, DC (New Year’s Day) http://www.stickyfingersbakery.com/
The Block off Biltmore, Asheville, NC http://theblockoffbiltmore.com/index.php/event/reggae-infinity-nye/
The Cheeze Factory Restaurant, Wisconsin Dells, WI (New Year’s Day) http://www.cheezefactoryrestaurant.com/
The Green Owl Café, Madison, WI http://www.greenowlcafe.com/events/
Urban Vegan Kitchen, New York City, NY http://www.urbanvegankitchen.com/
V Eats, Dallasl, TX http://www.v-eats.com/

IRA QUALIFIED CHARITABLE DISTRIBUTIONS

Posted on December 28, 2016 by The VRG Blog Editor

According to the IRS, generally, a qualified charitable distribution is
an otherwise taxable distribution from an IRA (other than an ongoing SEP
or SIMPLE IRA) owned by an individual who is age 70½ or over that is
paid DIRECTLY from the IRA to a qualified charity. See Pub. 590-B,
Distributions from Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs)) for
additional information or visit https://www.irs.gov/publications/p590b/index.html

Your qualified charitable distributions can satisfy all or part of the
amount of your required minimum distribution from your IRA. For example,
if your 2014 required minimum distribution was $10,000, and you made a
$5,000 qualified charitable distribution for 2014, you would have had to
withdraw another $5,000 to satisfy your 2014 required minimum distribution.

This is not personal tax advice, for which you should speak to your tax
and/or legal advisor.

THE VEGETARIAN RESOURCE GROUP OFFERS TWO $5,000 SCHOLARSHIPS PLUS ONE $10,000 SCHOLARSHIP

Posted on December 27, 2016 by The VRG Blog Editor

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Due to the generosity of an anonymous donor, The Vegetarian Resource Group each year will award $20,000 in college scholarship money to graduating U.S. high school students who have promoted veganism/vegetarianism in their schools and/or communities. Vegetarians do not eat meat, fish, or fowl. Vegans are vegetarians who do not use other animal products such as dairy or eggs.

One award of $10,000 and two awards of $5,000 will be given. Entries may only be sent by students graduating from high school in spring 2017. Deadline is February 20, 2017. We will accept applications postmarked on or before February 20, 2017. Early submission is encouraged.

Applicants will be judged on having shown compassion, courage, and a strong commitment to promoting a peaceful world through a vegan/vegetarian diet/lifestyle. Payment will be made to the student’s college (U.S. based only). Winners of the scholarships give permission to release their names to the media. Applications and essays become property of The Vegetarian Resource Group. We may ask finalists for more information. Scholarship winners are contacted by e-mail or telephone. Please look at your e-mail.

For details on the contest, see: http://www.vrg.org/student/scholar.htm

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