VRG Vegetarian Journal's Foodservice Update

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Vegetarian Journal's Foodservice Update (Vol. II, No. 1)



VEGETARIAN JOURNAL'S FOODSERVICE UPDATE
Healthy Tips and Recipes for Institutions

Volume II, Number 1 Editor: Mary Clifford, RD
Winter 1994 ISSN # 1072-0820


THE FIVE COMMANDMENTS: Top Tips for Success with Vegetarian
Foods by Laura Gilbert, MS, RD, Foodservice Director,
Albuquerque Academy

Is vegetarian food new to you or your staff? If so, these five
rules can help ensure a successful entry into meatless
foodservice.


1. ACCEPTABILITY. 
Make sure the food items are acceptable to the vegetarians
you're serving. What type of food is preferred? Lacto-ovo
(includes dairy and egg products), lacto (includes milk
products), or vegan (no dairy, egg, or honey products)? Plan
menus accordingly.

2. ACCESS TO INGREDIENTS. 
Talk to your suppliers. Are the ingredients you need readily
available? You need to evaluate how much time and money you
want to devote seeking out and buying from different
suppliers. You may need to modify your vegetarian recipes to
match your resources.

3. EASE OF PREPARATION. 
Consider staff skills, motivation, and time available for
preparation of new and different menu items. Staff may find
vegetarian foods and their preparation foreign. Easy-to-make
dishes will encourage them and give them confidence to prepare
other vegetarian foods.

4. COST. 
Determine total and portion costs. This will help you decide if
a particular dish will fit into your budget, what the selling
price should be, and whether it will fit into your customer's
budget. Even if you can afford a Fiddlehead Fern and Imported
Truffle Saute with Champagne Sauce, your customers may not.

5. AESTHETICS. 
Your food should look as good as it tastes. If your vegetarian
items tend to be monochramatic or messy (Is everything red or
brown? Do you mix the rice and beans and end up serving a soupy
bowl of starch?) you may be actively discouraging sales.
Remember, you want to encourage non-vegetarians as well as
vegetarians to try your new items. That, in turn, will
encourage the staff to continue quality preparation of
vegetarian food items.

BONUS TIP: 

WALT DISNEY'S FIRST COMMANDMENT:
 Start small and let it grow. 

***************************************************************
REVIEW: QUANTITY VEGETARIAN FOODS SEMINAR
by Reed Mangels PhD, RD

Over 350 people attended a session on quantity vegetarian
cooking at last fall's annual meeting of The American Dietetic
Association. Sponsored by the Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetics
Practice Group, the session featured experts in producing
quantity vegetarian food for a crowd.

Trudy Cravens, RD, PhD, from Worthington Foods discussed market
trends and the economic aspects of using vegetarian foods. She
highlighted one survey that found approximately 40% of
consumers were positive about vegetarian foods, mainly for
health reasons.

Cravens also pointed out that vegetarian foods such as grains
and legumes are generally less costly than meat, while meat
analogues cost about the same as meat.

A school foodservice perspective was provided by Laura Gilbert,
MS, RD, Food Service Director at Albuquerque Academy. They
serve 1200 meals daily, 100 of which are vegetarian. Her
students' favorite meatless meals include vegetarian lasagna,
meatless tacos, and veggie burgers.

Another panelist was Jean-Marc Fullsack, a classically trained
chef who has developed vegetarian meals for Dr. Dean Ornish's
Life Choice program. Dr. Ornish is best known for his research
on heart disease; his program consists of lowfat meals,
containing less than 10% of calories from fat.

Chef Fullsack suggests introducing people to vegetarian food
by using familiar ingredients such as potatoes and pasta. He
also emphasized using good-quality ingredients and
understanding the food preferences of your clientele. (An
interview with Chef Fullsack follows.)

Many vegetarian-friendly products were exhibited at The ADA
conference this year. (See the following list.)

Reed Mangels is Chair of the Vegetarian Nutrition Dietetic
Practice Group, a Practice Group of The American Dietetic
Association. She is also an advisor to The Vegetarian Resource
Group.

******************************************************************
COMPANIES TO CALL:

Following are a few of the many vegetarian companies and
products which I found interesting or helpful at The American
Dietetic Association's meeting.

Compiled by Reed Mangels, PhD, RD

American Dry Bean Board 
(308/632-2011): Recipes.
Archer Daniels Midland (217/424-5200): Burgers (frozen & dry mixes). 
Better 4U Foods, Inc. (715/735-3322): Frozen meatless chili, pasta sauce, and
sloppy Joes.
Ener-G Foods (800/331-5222): Egg-free, milk-free baking mixes.
Health Valley (818/334-3241): Fat-free vegetarian entrees.
Morningstar Farms (614/885-9511): Frozen meat alternatives.
Omaha Steaks FoodService (402/ 597-8100): Vegetarian burgers and taco
filling.
Produce Marketing Association (302/738-7100): Information on storing and
preparing fresh produce.
Rokeach Food Corporation (201/ 587-0024): Garden Gourmet meatless entrees.
Schreiber (800/245-5620): Kosher meatless meals.
Tamarind Tree (201/529-2011): Shelf-stable Indian vegetarian dinners.
United Soybean Board (314/576-2011): Info on soy foods, including soy flour,
tofu, and soy milk.
USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council (208/882-3023): Recipes and nutritional 
information.
Vitasoy (USA), Inc. (415/467-8888): Soymilk. 
Wholesome & Hearty Foods (503/238-0109): Vegetarian burger.

***************************************************************************
HINTS FROM DEAN ORNISH'S CHEFF: AN INTERVIEW WITH JEAN-MARC
FULLSACK

 Jean-Marc Fullsack, a classically-trained chef working with renowned
heart disease researcher Dr. Dean Ornish, was a panel member at The American
Dietetic Association's session on Quantity Vegetarian Cooking last fall. We
spoke with him prior to his presentation about his experiences with low-fat
vegetarian cooking.

Vegetarian Journal's Foodservice Update: Do you see more of a demand for
quantity vegetarian recipes?
Jean-Marc Fullsack: Yes, there is a really big demand now. Vegetarian is no
longer considered a fad.
FSU: Tell me about the kind of cooking you're doing now. 
JMF: We specialize in low fat. Our program is less than 10% of calories
from fat.
FSU: And to achieve that low of a fat level you basically have to omit all
animal products, except for a little bit of fat-free dairy. Are institutions
really going for that?
JMF: Yes, the response is very good. People love the taste. The key is to
tailor to the local cuisine, to the local tastes, to food they can relate to.
Make it a little simpler at first, so they get over the cultural shock. And
then they don't miss the meat.
FSU: Are you using tofu and tempeh, or do you stick with more familiar
foods?
JMF: We do use tofu and tempeh, in small amounts. Sometimes we use them in
stir-fries.
FSU: Do you do a lot of cooking from scratch, or do you use prepared
products? 
JMF: We cook everything from scratch, but it may be easier for someone just
starting out in vegetarian cooking to use prepared products. 
FSU: Did your training prepare you for the kind of meatless cooking you're
doing now? 
JMF: No, not at all. I was classically trained in France. At first, I was
turned off at the idea [of vegetarian cooking]. I mean, I had vegetarian
food before, but Dean Ornish's diet is basically no added fat. That was
different from what I had. And several years ago, there were very little
nonfat foods on the market. It's easier now, there's a big market for that.
FSU: How did you get started then, in light of the fact that you were a bit
apprehensive about the taste?
JMF: When you're used to classical cooking, the taste of meat takes over.
You have to get used to a new dimension in taste. I did a lot of research,
a lot of reading, on taste, how we perceive sweet, salty, that kind of
thing. You find when you use seaweed or similar foods you can duplicate the
kind of tastes meat provides.
FSU: That may be why vegetarian cooking seems to rely more on
non-traditional or ethnic foods, to incorporate richer flavors. 
JMF: If you can look to ethnic dishes you'll find many satisfying foods.
But even without those foods, you can make a very rich vegetable stock for
flavor.
FSU: What advice do you have for institutions looking to add vegetarian
items to their menus? JMF: You have to use a lot of common sense. Many
recipes can easily be adapted. You have to adapt them to your institution.
For instance, if it has to sit under a heat lamp for a long time, you need
to make a recipe that won't dry out. 

Jean-Marc Fullsack is a native of France. He is a former instructor at the
California Culinary Academy, and is presently chef for Dr. Ornish's
Lifestyle Heart Trial. 
*********************************************************************

RECIPES WANTED! 

Send your quantity vegetarian recipes for possible reprint in future issues
of Vegetarian Journal's Foodservice Update. We prefer to share healthy,
low-fat recipes that include a minimum of sweeteners. Use molasses or fruit
wherever sweeteners are used. Maple syrup could also be used instead of
honey. Please send recipes to: The Vegetarian Resource Group, PO Box 1463, 
Baltimore, MD 21203.
***************************************************************************

VEGETARIAN QUANTITY RECIPES

LENTILS, CHILIES & JICAMA SALAD
An innovative use of both lentils and jicama, with a dash of chilies for
bite. This recipe is courtesy of the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. Send a
self-addressed, stamped envelope to them at 5071 Highway 8 West, Moscow, ID
83843, or call (208) 882-3023 for additional recipes. Some of the recipes
call for meat, but a few small changes (for example, substitute vegetable
broth for chicken broth), will turn many of them into suitable vegetarian
dishes.

YIELD: 24 half-cup servings (3 quarts)
PER SERVING: 170 calories, 5 grams fat

INGREDIENTS AMOUNT PROCEDURE
USA Lentils  4 cups Cook lentils in broth 
 or water just tender, about
Vegetable broth or water2 quarts 15 minutes. Drain. In steam-
 jacketed kettle or stock pot,
Oil 1/2 cup heat oil over medium heat.
 Stir in onion and chilies.
Diced onion 2 cups Saute until onion is soft, 
Serrano chilies, minced 1 cup about 5 minutes. Stir in 
Corn kernels 2 cups corn, jicama, bell pepper,
Jicama, julienne-sliced 2 cups cilantro, basil, ginger,
Red bell pepper, diced 1 cup salt and pepper. Continue
Chopped cilantro 1/2 cup cooking an additional 3 to 5 
Dried basil 2 teaspoons minutes. Serve hot or cold.
Ground ginger 1 teaspoon
Salt and pepper To taste

MEATLESS SHEPHERD'S PIE
A hearty entree for cold winter evenings. Recipe courtesy of Worthington
Foods, Inc.
YIELD: 50 seven-ounce servings 
PER SERVING: 200 calories, 9 grams fat

INGREDIENTS AMOUNT PROCEDURE
All-purpose flour 8 oz Whip flour into cold water. Add 
Water 3 cups tomatoes and mix well. Add re-
Diced tomatoes 3 lbs maining ingredients except 
Carrot slices, frozen 2 lbs potatoes. Cook over medium heat
Canned green beans 2 lbs until mixture thickens. Pour 
Diced Onions 1 lb into shallow, steamable pans. 
Black pepper (optional) 1 tsp Prepare whipped potatoes 
Garlic powder	 1 tsp	 according to package directions.
La Loma Vege-Burger	 3 lbs	 Pipe through pastry tube on top
Whipped potatoes, prepared 12 lbs of vegetable mixture. Bake at
 350F for 30 minutes or until
 potatoes are golden brown.

FAT-FREE BLACK BEAN SALSA
I tasted this Borden Foodservice Kitchen recipe at The American Dietetic
Association convention in Anaheim, and thought it was great. It's not too
spicy, but it does have a very nice flavor. It would be perfect served with
crackers, but you might also want to try it as a condiment or even a garnish
for an entree, since it's very colorful. 

YIELD: 48 half-cup servings (1 gallon, 2 quarts)
PER SERVING: 49 calories, 0 grams fat

INGREDIENTS AMOUNT PROCEDURE
Dried black beans, cooked 2 lbs In bowl, combine beans, peppers,
and drained, or canned black tomatoes, celery, corn and onions;
beans, rinsed and drained mix well.
Chopped green bell pepper 9 oz
Chopped seeded tomatoes 2 lb, 4 oz
Finely chopped celery 5 oz
Canned corn, drained 14 oz
Chopped white onions 5 oz
Borden Fat Free Italian 2 lb, 2 oz 
Dressing In bowl, combine dressing, taco 
Borden Taco Sauce 4 oz sauce, and ReaLime brand; mix well.
ReaLime Lime Juice from 2 oz Pour dressing over bean mixture; 
Concentrate Mix well. Cover; refrigerate 4 
 hours or overnight.
 
**************************************************************************
BACK SHELF: Noteworthy events and product news you may have missed.

 Meatless Meat Pepper Steak (don't you love that name?) , Hawaiian
Style Meatless Chicken, and Meatless Stuffed Peppers are just a sampling of the
kosher frozen foods Schreiber sells. These are attractive, appetizing items
that will satistfy customers who want to keep kosher, as well as the
vegetarian or health-conscious consumer looking for something different.
Choose from 14 meatless food service products and 5 preplated dinners. 
Schreiber, 56-20 59th Street, Maspeth, NY 11378; phone (718) 894-2011; fax
(718) 326-4642.

 Tortilla chips with warm bean dip sounds like a major fat fest, right?
Not so. Guiltless Gourmet offers fat-free tortilla chips and dips. New
for foodservice, Guiltless Gourmet No Oil Baked Tortilla Chips come in
1-pound bags, available salted or unsalted. Their Spicy or BBQ pinto bean
and black bean dips are also fat free, and available in 52-ounce cans.
Guiltless Gourmet, Inc. 3709 Promontory Point Dr.#131, Austin, TX 78744;
phone (512) 443-4373; fax (512) 443-5052.

 If you don't know how to pronounce seitan, and you can't imagine what a
"Wheat Ball" is, you're not alone. But that doesn't give you an excuse to
overlook two excellent products, both made from wheat gluten, the protein in
flour that gives baked goods elasticity and texture. Processed gluten is
sometimes also called seitan (pronounced SAY-tahn). 
 Wheat Balls, made by Knox Mountain Farm, Inc. is a dry mix that, once
reconstituted and simmered, turns into a moist, fat-free "meat" that you can
grill, bake, or turn into meatballs. 
 Another seitan product to try is made by Vegan Epicure. Choose from
Cajun-, Pepperoni-, Szechuan-, Mexican-, Barbeque-, and even Hungarian
Peppercorn-Style. Vegan Epicure's seitan is also low in fat (1 gram per
serving), and it comes vacuum packed and ready to use in 1-, 2-, and 4-pound
loaves.
Knox Mountain Farm Inc., RFD 1, Franklin, NH 03235; phone (603) 934-9826.
Vegan Epicure, 210 Park Place, Ithaca, NY 14850; phone (607) 272-0432.

********************************************************
THEME DAYS TO CELEBRATE WITH A VEGETARIAN TWIST

February 14 Valentine's Day. Go heart-healthy! 
March 17 St. Patrick's Day. Offer veggie stews and other meatless dishes
instead of corned beef, because traditionally this was a meatless holiday.
March 20 Great American Meat-Out. 
April 21 Earth Day: veggie burgers are planet-friendly. 
May 30 Memorial Day: Try barbecuing marinated tofu and vegetable chunks.
June 19, 1885 The Statue of Liberty arrived from France. Serve veggie
heros on French bread.
July 4 Independence Day calls for tofu weiners.
August 5 National Mustard Day. Serve it on tofu hot dogs and veggie
burgers. Also, spotlight corn, peaches, and watermelon, the signature foods
of summer. 
September All-American Breakfast month. Serve pancakes, scrambled tofu,
French toast, and muffins. October 1 World Vegetarian Day.
November Thansksgiving 
December Christmas, Kwanzaa, and Chanukah call for gala meatless
celebrations.
***************************************************************************
WHAT IS A VEGETARIAN?

Vegetarians do not eat meat, fish, and poultry. Vegans are vegetarians who
abstain from eating or using all animal products, including milk, cheese,
other dairy items, eggs, wool, silk, or leather. Among the many reasons for
being a vegetarian are health, ecological, and religious concerns, dislike 
of meat, compassion for animals, belief in non-violence, and economics. The
American Dietetic Association has affirmed that a vegetarian diet can meet
all known nutrient needs. The key to a healthy vegetarian diet, as with any
other diet, is to eat a wide variety of foods, including fruits, vegetables,
plenty of leafy greens, whole grain products, nuts, seeds, and legumes.
Limit your intake of sweets and fatty foods.

WHAT IS THE VEGETARIAN RESOURCE GROUP?

Our health professionals, activists, and educators work with businesses and
individuals to bring about healthy changes in your school, workplace, and
community. Registered dietitians and physicians aid in the development of
nutrition-related publications and answer member and media questions about
vegetarian diets. The Vegetarian Resource Group is a non-profit
organization. Financial support comes primarily from memberships,
contributions, and book sales.
******************************************************************
SUBSTITUTIONS FOR EGGS, DAIRY AND MEAT

EGG REPLACERS

Use any one of the following to substitute for one egg in baked goods:
1 mashed, ripe banana
2 tablespoons cornstarch or arrowroot
Ener-G Egg Replacer or similar product (available in health food stores or
 by mail from Ener-G Foods, Inc., P.O. Box 84487, Seattle, WA 98124
 (800) 331-9788.
1/4 cup tofu (blend tofu with liquid ingredients before adding to dry
 ingredients)

DAIRY SUBSTITUTES 
Soy, nut, or rice milks
Fruit juice (for baked goods)
Soy margarine
Soy yogurt

MEAT SUBSTITUTES
Tempeh (cultured soybeans with a chewy texture)
Tofu (freezing and then thawing gives tofu a `meaty' texture. The tofu will
 turn slightly yellow or off-white in color when frozen, but this is
 natural; it does not mean it is spoiled.
Wheat gluten or seitan (made from wheat and has the texture of meat).

Reprinted from "Vegetarianism in a Nutshell." For sources of the above
foods, see Vegetarian Quantity Recipes, by The Vegetarian Resource Group.
**********************************************************************
CATALOG

BOOKS 

"VEGETARIAN JOURNAL'S GUIDE TO NATURAL FOODS RESTAURANTS" ($13) Lists
over 1500 restaurants. Talk to others in your area who are already serving
vegetarian customers. Covers U.S. and Canada. 270 pp.

"TOFU COOKERY" ($17) Revised ed, by L. Hagler. Color photos and over 200
recipes. The perfect book to introduce yourself and your staff to tofu.
Learn simple tricks to alter the texture, and turn it into everything from
main dishes to desserts. 160 pp.
Printed on recycled paper.

"SIMPLY VEGAN" ($12) by Debra Wasserman and Reed Mangels, Ph.D., R.D.
Contains a comprehensive nutrition section covering iron, protein, Vitamin
B12, calcium, and other nutrients your customers and clients may have
questions about. Also contains over 160 quick and easy vegan recipes, menus,
and meal plans. 224 pp.

"THE NEW LAUREL'S KITCHEN" ($24) by Robertson, Flinders, & Ruppenthal.
Considered by many to be the bible of vegetarian cooking. Over 500 recipes
and an in-depth vegetarian nutrition section. 512 pp.

"VEGETARIAN QUANTITY RECIPES" ($15; $5 for students) Packet includes 28
vegan recipes (entrees, side dishes, soups, etc.) with serving sizes of 25
and 50, and nutritional analysis for every recipe. Also includes "Tips for
Introducing Vegetarian Food Into Institutions," (see description, below), a
list of suppliers of vegetarian foods available in bulk, as well as
information on how these foods meet the requirements of school lunch
programs.

"TIPS FOR INTRODUCING VEGETARIAN FOOD INTO INSTITUTIONS" 
(free with "Vegetarian Quantity Recipes," description above,
or $3 purchased separately,) How to modify existing menus and recipes, reduce
fat content, labor saving tips, menu ideas.


EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES
Great for staff, students, teachers, and theme days.

THE VEGETARIAN GAME ($20) IBM-compatible computer game offers 750
questions on health, nutrition, vegetarian foods, and other categories. 
Specify 3.5 or 5.25 disk.

ATHLETES AND VEGETARIANISM. ($3). Sound nutrition for athletes.

THE VEGAN DIET DURING PREGNANCY, LACTATION, AND CHILDHOOD ($3) By
Reed Mangels, Ph.D, RD.

I LOVE ANIMALS AND BROCCOLI ACTIVITY BOOK ($5) Education activities on
vegetarianism. For middle grades or younger children with adult help (48
pp).

VEGETARIAN VIDEOS for loan. Food Without Fear and Diet for a New America
cover health, ethics, and environmental issues (30 minutes each). $5 per
video you would like to borrow.


VEGETARIAN NUTRITION FOR TEENS Brochure by Reed Mangels, Ph.D, RD. Ten
cents each for quantity orders.

ESSAY CONTEST for students 19 and under/vegetarian lesson plan.

FOOD EXPERIENCE PROJECTS for young children. Great for camps, daycare.

I LOVE ANIMALS AND BROCCOLI COLORING BOOK. (1 copy, SASE with 2 first-class
stamps; quantity orders, 15=A2 each) This 8 1/2-by-11 8-page booklet for 
3 to 7 year olds encourages healthy eating.

TIPS ON SPEAKING ABOUT VEGETARIANISM TO CLASSES (SASE with 2 first-class
stamps).

VEGETARIANISM IN A NUTSHELL handout. Basic information about vegetarianism
plus quick recipes. To receive a quantity, send a donation for postage.

Make checks payable to Vegetarians, and mail to The Vegetarian Resource
Group, Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203. 

Prices include shipping. MD residents please add 6% sales tax. Add 20% to
non-USA book orders and please pay with a US$ postal order or by
MasterCard/Visa. 

FOODSERVICE UPDATE ORDER FORM

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Title:_____________________________________________

Organization:______________________________________

Address:___________________________________________

 ___________________________________________

Telephone:_________________________________________

Check one:

_____ 1 year subscription to Foodservice Update and the bimonthly
 Vegetarian Journal: $25
_____ 1 year subscription to Foodservice Update only: $20

Sponsorships:

_____ Corporate Contributor $100

_____ Corporate Supporter $500

_____ Corporate Benefactor $1000

Return to:

 The Vegetarian Resource Group
 P.O. Box 1463
 Baltimore, MD 21203 
 Phone: (410) 366-8343

For questions, comments or corrections to the electronic edition of 
Vegetarian Journal's Foodservice Update, send email to Brad Scott at vrg@vrg.org.



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