VRG-NEWS: The Vegetarian Resource Group Newsletter
Volume 17, Issue 11

December 2013

CONTENTS

  1. YEAR END DONATIONS
  2. HOLIDAY RECIPES
  3. BECOMING VEGAN — HOLIDAY GIFTS AT ½ PRICE
  4. NOTE FROM THE EDITOR
  5. COOKING VEGAN FOR SIX RESIDENTS IN AN ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY -- MINI QUICK PIZZAS; FALAFEL WRAPS; MASHED POTATOES, PEAS, AND CORN; CHOCOLATE MILKSHAKE; SLOPPY JOES; CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES
  6. GIVE A VEGETARIAN JOURNAL GIFT SUBSCRIPTION
  7. UPDATE ON DOMINOS PIZZA
  8. BEING VEGETARIAN OR VEGAN DURING HOLIDAYS OR FAMILY GATHERINGS
  9. GIVING MINIMUM REQUIRED IRA DISTRIBUTIONS TO CHARITY
  10. ABOUT THE VEGETARIAN RESOURCE GROUP AND VRG-NEWS

1) YEAR END DONATIONS

To support Vegetarian Resource Group research and outreach to health professionals and consumers, please donate at:

https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ]

Or join at:

http://www.vrg.org/member/ ]

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2) HOLIDAY RECIPES

Enjoy these recipes:

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3) BECOMING VEGAN — HOLIDAY GIFTS AT ½ PRICE

Help spread the word. While supplies last, we can send you five Becoming Vegan books (282 pages) for $45, including shipping. Normal retail price is $99. Give copies as gifts to friend, relatives, libraries, and others. Use as raffle prizes for your organization. Included in Becoming Vegan is information on Protein, Phytochemicals, Fatty Acid Composition of foods, Pregnancy and Lactation, Seniors, Weight Loss, Weight Gain, and Vegan Athletes. Covered are Sources of Calcium, Iron, and Zinc, as well as Chromium, Copper, Fluoride, and Iodine, Magnesium, Selenium and Potassium. Also helpful is a chapter on B12, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Pyridoxine, Folate, and Biotin. Plus learn valuable info about Vitamins A, C, D, E, and K. Also featured are 1600, 2200, 2500, and 4000 calorie menus. Help spread the word by buying these books, as well as also financially supporting our outreach.

Send $45 to

The Vegetarian Resource Group
P.O. Box, 1463
Baltimore, MD 21203

Call (410) 366-8343 Monday to Friday 9AM to 5PM Eastern Time, or go to:
[ www.vrg.org/donate ]

Write your order in the Comments Section.

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4) NOTE FROM THE EDITOR

The author of Cooking Vegan for Six Residents in an Assisted Living Facility (next entry) is Kitty Jones. She was a Vegetarian Resource Group College Scholarship winner and intern. For information about scholarships, see http://www.vrg.org/blog/2012/07/06/vrg-awards-washington-student-5000-vegetarian-scholarship/ http://www.vrg.org/student/scholar.htm Deadline is February 20.

For information about internships, see

http://www.vrg.org/student/ ]

To donate to Vegetarian Resource Group internships, scholarships, and other projects, please make year end donations at

https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ]

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5) COOKING VEGAN FOR SIX RESIDENTS IN AN ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY -- MINI QUICK PIZZAS; FALAFEL WRAPS; MASHED POTATOES, PEAS, AND CORN; CHOCOLATE MILKSHAKE; SLOPPY JOES; CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES

By Kitty Jones, VRG Intern

I spent about two months working as a cook at an assisted living facility that was home to six residents. Most of the residents had been eating standard American diets for much of their lives. They had unhealthy levels of cholesterol and other health and digestive issues. I was asked to work there and cook healthy vegan meals, which do not contain cholesterol and are generally low in saturated fats, higher in fiber, vitamins, and minerals. The residents were not accustomed to tofu and falafel, so I had to improvise and adapt their favorite comfort foods into vegan versions. I had a lot of fun incorporating vegan food into the residents' diets and learned a lot along the way.

It didn't take long for me to realize that the people I was cooking for were simply not comfortable with new types of foods; they wanted familiar (and I wanted healthy and cruelty-free) foods. For example, I had made what I thought were delicious falafel wraps with whole wheat tortillas and organic spinach. At dinner the residents were all enjoying these wraps until one of the women asked, "Is this chicken meat?" I responded, "No, this is falafel, it's made from chickpeas and veggies." Then another woman asked, "What's falafel?" and she put down her wrap and wouldn't eat it. Only two of the residents refused to eat the falafel that night, but still I felt bad for making something they didn't like and weren't accustomed to. Then I discovered the key to pleasing the residents - simply asking what they wanted. I inquired what they would like to eat and from then on they told me what they wanted for breakfast, lunch and dinner. I made vegan versions of their favorites, which they almost always enjoyed.

The American diet traditionally has been heavily focused around meat, dairy and eggs, and the residents were very fond of these animal products as well. However, being an ethical vegan myself and wanting them to be healthier, I simply could not put animal products into their food. The residents didn’t like tempeh as much as I do, so I found some really great meat substitutes including Field Roast, Tofurky and Yves that they enjoyed. Some of the meals they asked me to make were Sloppy Joes, pizza, lasagna, biscuits and gravy, burgers, mashed potatoes with peas and corn, cookies, and milkshakes. Some of the recipes for these dishes are listed below, as well as lists of vegan dairy, egg and meat substitutes. One of their favorite desserts was ice cream and their vegan favorites included: Tofutti Cuties, Coconut Bliss and So Delicious brands.

Some residents were on special diets such as low sodium, low fiber, and low sugar. I had to adapt what I prepared for each individual. For the residents on low sodium diets I simply reduced the amount of salt in their meals and used tomato sauce, vegan meats, vegan milks, breads, and other condiments that had less salt. When shopping I would compare the vegan meats or milks I was going to buy and purchase the ones with less salt. Also, plain tofu has low sodium content. I also used vegetable oil instead of vegan butter because it is cheaper and does not contain added salt. Some residents could not handle too many leafy green veggies in their diets. I gave them smaller salads and replaced the greens in their wraps and other savory meals with extra tomatoes, tofu, potatoes, or any other ingredient I could add more of in place of greens. For those on low sugar diets I gave them unsweetened almond or soy milk as well as put less sugar in their meals and desserts. I could often make a separate batch of cookies for my low-sugar residents that contained half the amount of sugar in the original recipe. If I did give them something sweet, I made sure it was less processed than white sugar, such as chopped fresh fruits. I didn’t give them fruit from a can because those are often soaked in sugar syrup

My boss and I found that feeding the residents vegan did not cost more than feeding them animal products The key to saving money is to buy in bulk. We often went to local stores like Fred Meyers, Safeway, Costco, and Whole Foods. However we order most of our products directly from the companies and bought in bulk. For example, I could call up the natural foods store and order a 25 pound bag of black beans. I also bought large bags of oats, rice, flour, sugar, raisins, chickpeas and other staples that we used a lot of. These items store very well and by buying large quantities I saved (depending on the product) up to 25% off what it would have cost to buy the items in smaller pre-packaged quantities. You can also buy powdered soymilk and rice milk. All you need to do is mix the powder with water. There are directions on the packages. It is very cost-effective to buy powdered soymilk as compared to buying cartons of it. If you’re feeling adventurous, I highly recommend making your own alternative milks too. I would often (and still do) buy jars of unsalted almond butter and mix Œ cup of it with six cups of water in the blender. I would put some of this unsweetened almond milk into a big jar. With the remaining almond milk I would add about œ teaspoon of salt and a few tablespoons of sugar to taste. The residents loved these milks. Note: that the milk with sugar and salt stays fresher longer than does the unsweetened variety.

*I highly encourage the use of organic ingredients when budget allows. If you have vegan residents who are concerned if the sugar being used is vegan, organic sugar may be acceptable to them. Note that if you are making your own plant milks, you may need to replace nutrients in other ways that are in fortified soy and nut milks. The contents of this article and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical or nutrition advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your best judgement about whether a product is suitable for you or your clients. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

Mini Quick Pizzas (one serving)
Crust:

  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons oil
  • 1/4 cup water

Suggested toppings:

  • Vegan cheese (Daiya is recommended)
  • Tomato sauce
  • Sliced Tofurky sausage
  • Sliced veggies; mushrooms, bell peppers, spinach

This recipe makes one pizza for one person. Multiply the measurements by however many people you're making pizza for. I would make these crusts and have the residents put whatever they wanted on top of the pizza. Mix all dry ingredients for pizza crust in one bowl and wet ones in another. Combine and mix thoroughly. Knead the dough on a floured surface about 6 times. Roll it out and shape it into your pizza. Place on oiled cookie sheet, add toppings and cook in oven at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes depending on how crunchy you want the crust to be.

Falafel Wraps (6 servings)

  • 6 tortilla wraps
  • 2 cups baked beans (or 1 can)
  • 1 bell pepper (sliced)
  • Handful of greens (spinach, lettuce, etc)
  • 18 falafel balls
  • Oil for pan
  • Tomato sauce or ketchup
  • 1 cup grated vegan cheese (optional)

Warm falafel balls in a pan with some oil. Steam the tortillas or heat in toaster oven until slightly soft. Lay out the desired amount of beans, ketchup, vegan cheese (I recommend Daiya), greens, and falafel balls along the middle of the tortilla. Gently wrap the tortilla around the food inside and serve. * Falafel balls can be purchased at many ethnic and health food stores or ordered online

Mashed Potatoes, Peas and Corn (6 servings)

  • 8-10 potatoes chopped (peeling optional)
  • 1 cup of peas
  • 1 cup of sweet corn
  • 1/2 cup vegan butter, refined coconut oil, or vegetable oil (You may want to use less.)
  • 3 teaspoon finely minced garlic
  • 1/4 cup soy or almond milk
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Vegan sour cream (optional)

Boil chopped potatoes until soft while heating corn and peas in a pan. Drain potatoes. In a blender, food processor or mixer, combine potatoes and all ingredients except corn and peas. Blend until smooth, and gently stir in corn and peas.

Chocolate Milkshake (makes 8oz smoothie)

  • 1/2 cup chocolate/vanilla vegan ice cream
  • Chocolate syrup to taste
  • 1/4 cup of soy or almond milk
  • Handful of raw spinach or kale

Blend all ingredients in a blender. If you're low on ice cream, I found that you can use 1 frozen banana and œ an avocado instead, which is healthy and delicious!

Sloppy Joes (6 servings)

  • Oil for pan
  • 1 1/2 packages vegan ground 'beef'
  • 6 buns or 12 slices of bread
  • Sauce (or you can buy canned sauce):
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar or alternative sweetener
  • 1 teaspoons paprika
  • 1 teaspoons salt
  • 2/3 cup onion, chopped
  • 1/4 cup celery
  • 1 bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon vegan Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/3 cup ketchup
  • 1 cup water

Mix all sauce ingredients in a blender or bowl and pour over the 'beef' (I recommend Gimme Lean) in a pan. On medium heat cook and allow to simmer for 15 minutes, stir frequently. Glop onto buns, and serve.

Chocolate Chip Cookies (makes about 30 cookies, depending on size)

  • 2 1/2 cups flour (white, whole wheat or a mix)
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cup brown sugar or alternative sweetener
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cup sugar (preferably unprocessed cane sugar)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup vegetable oil or vegan butter
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups chocolate chips
  • 2 vegan eggs using Ener-G Egg Replacer (follow directions on the box)

* sugar and oil amounts can be adjusted without altering the outcome. You could, for example use half as much oil as the recipe calls for.

Mix dry ingredients in one bowl and beat together wet ingredients in another. Combine wet and dry ingredients and stir until well mixed. Add chocolate chips. Drop spoonfuls of dough on oiled cookie sheet and bake about 10 minutes at 350 degrees until edges are golden.

Meat Substitutes (great in pasta, lasagna, with breakfast, etc):

Dairy Substitutes:

(Ice creams)
So Delicious (www.sodeliciousdairyfree.com)
Tofutti Cuties (www.tofutti.com)
(Milks)
Almond Breeze (www.almondbreeze.com)
Silk Soymilk (www.silk.com)
Pacific Soy and Almond milk (www.pacificfood.com)
Also available are milks made from; Hazelnut, oat, coconut, hemp, rice, and flax.
(Yogurts)
Whole Soy & Co. (www.wholesoyco.com)
So Delicious (www.sodeliciousdairyfree.com)
(Mayonnaise)
Vegenaise (www.vegenaise.com)
Spectrum Canola Mayonnaise (www.spectrumorganics.com)
Nayonaise (www.nasoya.com)
(Butter)
Vegetable oil Earth Balance (www.earthbalancenatural.com)
Coconut oil Spectrum Spread (www.spectrumorganics.com)
(Cheese)
Daiya (www.daiyafoods.com)
Follow Your Heart (www.followyourheart.com)
Galaxy Foods (www.galaxyfoods.com)

Egg Substitutes:

Ener-G (for baking) (www.ener-g.com) Tofu (for scrambles) There are many other egg substitutes depending on what you are making. You can find more ideas here:

http://www.bestveganguide.com/vegan-egg-substitutes.html ]

For more food service tips check out

http://www.vrg.org/fsupdate/index.htm ]

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6) GIVE A VEGETARIAN JOURNAL GIFT SUBSCRIPTION

GO TO:

http://www.vrg.org/member/ ]

When you check out, uncheck that the billing address is the same as the shipping address, and indicate the address of the gift recipient. If you want us to send a note to the person receiving the gift, under where you type in your e-mail, write the note next to Add special instructions to the seller.

You can also give at [www.vrg.org/donate] Write the address of the recipient and note you want sent in the Comments section. 0r call (410) 366-8343 Monday to Friday, 9AM to 5PM Eastern Time. If you want us to use the donation to give a subscription to a foodservice staffperson who comes by one of our outreach booths, please indicate in the notes.

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7) UPDATE ON DOMINOS PIZZA

See:

http://www.vrg.org/blog/2013/11/18/parmesan-asiago-cheese-on-domino%E2%80%99s-pacific-veggie-pizza-contains-animal-derived-lipase/ ]

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8) BEING VEGETARIAN OR VEGAN DURING HOLIDAYS OR FAMILY GATHERINGS

See:

http://www.vrg.org/blog/2013/11/26/being-vegetarianvegan-during-holidays-or-family-gatherings/ ]

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9) GIVING MINIMUM REQUIRED IRA DISTRIBUTIONS TO CHARITY

According to Forbes, the fiscal cliff deal had a special tax break for donations by seniors. Those 70œ and older are able to transfer as much as $100,000 per year from their traditional IRAs to charity. The provision last expired at the end of 2011. In the tax deal, Congress has extended it through 2013. Unless an IRA is a Roth, the account owner must take yearly minimum required distributions starting at age 70œ and pay tax on the distribution. With the charitable IRA rollover, as it is called, the donation can count against the minimum required distribution he/she would otherwise be required to take.

Instead of taking money out of an IRA, the owner asks the custodian of the account to send a certain sum directly to charity. Annual minimum distributions have to be taken by December 31st. In 2013, you must ask the IRA custodian to send the distribution directly to the charity. While there is no income tax deduction for the donor’s contributions, the sum going to charity is not included in gross income. IRA funds donated this way can not be used for contributions to donor-advised funds, supporting organizations or private non-operating foundations. Otherwise, the money can go to any organization to which you can make a gift that would qualify as a charitable deduction (such as The Vegetarian Resource Group) on your tax return. This is not personal tax or legal advice. Please speak to your lawyer or financial advisor.

To make year end donations to The Vegetarian Resource Group, visit www.vrg.org/donate, call (410) 366-8343, or write to:

The Vegetarian Resource Group
P.O. Box 1463
Baltimore, MD 21203

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10) ABOUT THE VEGETARIAN RESOURCE GROUP AND VRG-NEWS

Our health professionals, activists, and educators work with businesses and individuals to bring about healthful changes in your school, workplace, and community. Registered dietitians and physicians aid in the development of nutrition-related publications and answer member and media questions about vegetarian diets. The Vegetarian Resource Group is a non-profit organization. Financial support comes primarily from memberships, donations, bequests, and book sales. The Vegetarian Journal, a print magazine, is a benefit of membership in The VRG. (For more information, please see the Vegetarian Journal online.)

If you would like to make a donation, become a member, volunteer, or find out more about The VRG, contact us at:

The Vegetarian Resource Group
P.O. Box 1463
Baltimore, MD 21203
Phone: (410) 366-8343
Fax: (410) 366-8804
E-mail: vrg@vrg.org
Website: [ http://www.vrg.org ]
Like us on Facebook: [ http://www.facebook.com/thevegetarianresourcegroup ]
Follow us on Twitter: [ http://twitter.com/VegResourceGrp ]
Donate: [ https://www.givedirect.org/give/givefrm.asp?CID=1565 ]

The contents of this newsletter, and our other publications, including Vegetarian Journal, are not intended to provide personal medical advice. Medical advice should be obtained from a qualified health professional. We often depend on product and ingredient information from company statements. It is impossible to be 100% sure about a statement, info can change, people have different views, and mistakes can be made. Please use your own best judgment about whether a product is suitable for you. To be sure, do further research or confirmation on your own.

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ABOUT VRG-NEWS

VRG-NEWS is the e-mail newsletter of The Vegetarian Resource Group. This is an announcement list so subscriber messages are not accepted by the list. If you have a technical question about the list, please contact us at vrg@vrg.org. If you have any suggestions, ideas, or corrections to VRG-NEWS, please direct them to vrg@vrg.org. Thanks!

To subscribe, unsubscribe, or otherwise manage your subscription to VRG-NEWS, visit [ http://lists.vrg.org/mailman/listinfo/vrg-news_lists.vrg.org ]

If you are a new subscriber, you might enjoy reading past issues of VRG-NEWS online at [ http://www.vrg.org/vrgnews/ ].

Contents of VRG-NEWS are copyright 2013 by The Vegetarian Resource Group. The newsletter may be freely distributed in electronic or print form provided its contents are not altered and credit is given to The Vegetarian Resource Group, P.O. Box 1463, Baltimore, MD 21203.

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